Short S.26 Golden Hind
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Peter West, e-mail, 19.06.2024 18:13

Does anyone have detailed photographs of the refitted interior of the Golden Hind c 1954? The Eastchurch Aviation Museum has been donated 4 tables reputed to come from the aircraft and is anxious to have any provenance.


Robert J Byrne, e-mail, 30.07.2023 04:28

Love the flying boat era, commentary and first hand accounts of those who flew on the G-26 Golden Hind. I understand that in its latter years say 1945-47 it was returned to a luxury configuration flying UK to the Far East.

I worked for Pan Am and personally knew pilots, passengers and crew who flew on the M-130 China Clipper and the Boeing 314 Clippers that actually flew the Atlantic and Pacific routes.

I also had the good fortune to fly on the Sikorsky VS-44A Excambian flying boat when it was owned by secondary carrier Catalina Air Lines in 1965. This aircraft was also one of only three built for Trans-Ocean service with American Export Airlines and did compete with Pan Am over the Atlantic 1942-1945. Of approximately 25 American, French and British long range Trans-Ocean flying boats that actually saw commercial service with Pan Am, Imperial/BOAC or Air France 1935-1948, the VS-44A Excambian is the lone long range commercial survivor and is housed today at the New England Aviation Museum in Windsor Locks, CT.


Robert J Byrne, e-mail, 30.07.2023 04:27

Love the flying boat era, commentary and first hand accounts of those who flew on the G-26 Golden Hind. I understand that in its latter years say 1945-47 it was returned to a luxury configuration flying UK to the Far East.

I worked for Pan Am and personally knew pilots, passengers and crew who flew on the M-130 China Clipper and the Boeing 314 Clippers that actually flew the Atlantic and Pacific routes.

I also had the good fortune to fly on the Sikorsky VS-44A Excambian flying boat when it was owned by secondary carrier Catalina Air Lines in 1965. This aircraft was also one of only three built for Trans-Ocean service with American Export Airlines and did compete with Pan Am over the Atlantic 1942-1945. Of approximately 25 American, French and British long range Trans-Ocean flying boats that actually saw commercial service with Pan Am, Imperial/BOAC or Air France 1935-1948, the VS-44A Excambian is the lone long range commercial survivor and is housed today at the New England Aviation Museum in Windsor Locks, CT.


Alexander Lewis, e-mail, 17.09.2022 21:24

can anyone let me know what the take off and landing distances were on water? How large a body of water did it need to operate on?


Paul Sheehan, e-mail, 07.07.2022 06:43

Hi Robin. I just found your post on aviatstar.org from 9 Sep 2009. Do you by chance have details of the operational movements of the 3 G Class boats from the time they went to Helensburgh until they moved to Pembroke Dock on attachment to RAAF No.10 Squadron. I just finished writing a book on the Empires which will be published later this year. Cabot and Caribou were not at Helensburgh. They were converted for the RASF at Calshot and were based at Invergordon after that. I could swap you details if you'd like them. Cheers
Paul Sheehan, Melbourne, Australia


Quentin Heron, e-mail, 08.05.2021 07:21

Hi Matt:

Only three (3) S.26 Grenadier (or: G-) class flying boats were ever built by Shorts.

The name of the class was originally derived from Imperial's intention of naming the first example of the type "Grenadier". Likewise, it was intended to name the second example "Grenville".

In the end, this was not to be: the first S.26 to fly (on 21 July 1939) was named "Golden Hind" (instead of: "Grenadier") and was registered G-AFCI. This had a manufacturer's serial number (or "company number" or: "c/n") of S.871.

The second G-class to fly was: "Golden Fleece" (instead of: "Grenville") on 24 February 1940, registered G-AFCJ (c/n: S.872).

The third and last G-class to fly was: "Golden Horn" (no alternative original name) on 8 July 1940, registered G-AFCK (c/n: S.873).

Golden Fleece (serving as X8274 with No. 10 Squadron RAAF) crashed on landing near Cape Finisterre off the west coast of Spain on 20 June 1941.

Golden Horn was returned to BOAC, but was lost at Lisbon, being destroyed when an engine seized and caught fire during a test flight on 9 January 1943.

Golden Hind was returned to service with BOAC and alone survived the Second World War, flying on in civil service until retirement in 1947.

Golden Hind then lay moored on the River Medway near the Shorts factory at Rochester in Kent, until 1954.

Whilst being towed to a new anchorage on 31 March 1954, Golden Hind ran aground on the River Swale near Harty Ferry on the Isle of Sheppey and was damaged beyond repair. the aircraft was subsequently scrapped, very shortly thereafter.

No other examples exist of the type or have existed since Golden Hind was scrapped in 1954.

Hope this helps.

Quentin


Matt, e-mail, 13.09.2020 12:07

Does anybody know what became of the 5 X G class Short flying boats after the war and whether any have survived? I am interested in finding out the history on these particular aircraft as my grandfather flew in these during the war on reconnaissance missions when they were based in Lisbon, Portugal.


michael, e-mail, 02.08.2020 14:03

My first ever flight was in the Golden Hind, from Poole to Belfast at the age of 17, in 1947. I was allowed to stand between the pilots throughout the flight, take off and landing.


Michael Hall, e-mail, 29.03.2015 20:17

I was a passenger on BOAC Golden Hind in the spring of 1947, at the age of 11. We flew from Poole to Cairo. My first flight.


Klaatu83, e-mail, 10.02.2012 01:23

The "G-Class" flying boats were enlarged versions of the famous "Empire Boats". They were intended for operation on a non-stop trans-Atlantic passenger service, for which the otherwise-successful "Empire Boats" possessed insufficient range. If the war hadn't broken out in 1939 then Imperial Airways/BOAC would undoubtedly have ended up operating a fleet of these airplanes to Canada and the U.S.


deaftom, e-mail, 27.03.2011 19:25

It should be clarified that "Golden Hind" was not the type name but the name given to a particular individual S.26. The type was called the "G" Class by Imperial Airways, and the individual S.26 aircraft were named Golden Fleece, Golden Hind, Golden Horn, Grenadier, and Grenville.


from robin bird, e-mail, 09.09.2009 19:28

I am writing a book on MAEE Helensburgh. I know Golden Hind Golden Fleece and Golden Horn were at Helensburgh but were Cabot and Caribou before their mission to Norway?



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