De Havilland D.H.82 Tiger Moth
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Phil Hall, e-mail, 16.02.2021 11:36

Hello Vincas,
I see from an old email you put a M332 into a Tiger Moth. I’m currently working on doing the same thing.
Could you email me please so that we can discuss what you did and your experiences.
Thanks
Phil


Peter Jerdan, e-mail, 16.03.2016 08:59

Peter Jerdan...I have the dubious distinction of having flown backwards in a Tiger Moth on my second solo at Bankstown, Sydney. ( National Service Training, 1954). A 60 knot line squall went thru Bankstown as I was on final - at 58 knots...
I made my first command decision at that stage to increase my approach speed. Took me 20 minutes to reach the field!


Peter Jerdan, e-mail, 16.03.2016 08:58

Peter Jerdan...I have the dubious distinction of having flown backwards in a Tiger Moth on my second solo at Bankstown, Sydney. ( National Service Training, 1954). A 60 knot line squall went thru Bankstown as I was on final - at 58 knots...
I made my first command decision at that stage to increase my approach speed. Took me 20 minutes to reach the field!


Dave Bernard, e-mail, 03.02.2015 11:39

I was awarded an Air Cadet Flying Scholarship in the mid 1960s. Originally assigned to the West London Aero Club at White Waltham - someone bent the oleo on a Tri-Pacer and I ended up at Shoreham where I was told to report to the West Sussex Aero Club. To my delight I was assigned to fly a DH82C. Easy to fly - but difficult to fly well and I never reached the latter standard!


Dave Smith, e-mail, 19.09.2014 22:31

I learnt to fly initially on T.M.'s at No.4 FTS,RAF Heany, Southern Rhodesia. Our course, in 1951, was the very last to use T.M.'s in the RAF;following courses used Chipmunks & in the UK, T.M.'s had already been superceded by other types. To Janet;-Sven is correct that seating was tandem but "pilot i/c in rear seat" is correct for passegers only; for pupils, instructor was in front seat. I remember my 1st instructor putting his arms over the side & raising & lowering them to make the a/c go up & down.


Frank Parker, e-mail, 22.06.2014 22:20

I learned to fly on Tiger Moths in the 1950's at White Waltham. At that time the CFI at West London Aero Club was Joan Hughes, a former ATA pilot signed off to fly everything in the RAF inventory from trainers to four engine bombers. The advantage of flying with Joan was that her higher pitched voice made it easier to hear her over the Gosport tubes with the engine running! With my main instructor, Mac, also ex-ATA, we just throttled back to talk!


jon elbourne, e-mail, 16.05.2013 15:40

Was the Tiger ever fitted with radio shielded magnetos?


John Stottle, e-mail, 13.09.2012 11:05

I had the pleasure of flying the Tiger Moth with the Peshawar Flying Club in Peshawar West Pakistan. It is the most fun flying I have ever done. Its registration was AP-AHZ.
Raqeeb Kahn was my flight instructor. We both went on to
become DC-10 captains, he with Pakistan International Airways and I with United Airlines.


Kevin Morrow, e-mail, 27.08.2012 21:26

I saw these at Cotswold Aiport of the Best of British Show. There were nine of these and they called them the "Nine Tigers".


Kevin Morrow, e-mail, 27.08.2012 18:45

I saw these at Cotswold Aiport of the Best of British Show. There were nine of these and they called them the "Nine Tigers".


Sven, 12.01.2012 23:35

Janet. Moth trainers were all fore and aft seating. Pilot in command sat in the rear seat. Communication was through a gosport tube.quite simply a speaking tube between the cockpits. Other points of note. Magneto ignition switches were on the outside of the fuselage in front of each cockpit. Climbing on the cowling to reach the fuel tank was on a cold day a miserable task.


Frank Russell, e-mail, 12.01.2012 09:14

I trained as a student pilot on T-Moths at 10 EFTS, Pendelton,Ont,Canada in the winter --- the hardest part was keeping warm --- Loved that machine!!


Janet Woods, e-mail, 12.10.2011 10:34

I do have a question - something simple to moth pilots I imagine, but I haven't been able to find out so far. It's for a fictional book so I need to get my facts straight. It's 1934 and the hero is teaching the heroine to fly. Did the early moth have side by side seats for training then - or fore and aft? If the latter,how was the tuition carried out? Would the trainee sit up front and the pilot shout instructions through a megaphone, or would he have duplicate controls he could use? Radio communications perhaps? Thanks if you can help.


sunderajan, e-mail, 09.07.2011 17:54

Way back in 1950, I learnt flying in a tiger moth at the CEYLON AIR ACADEMY Ratmalana Airport Colombo. Just about to get my solo after 20 hours of dual, with Capt.Amarasekara i was posted back to Bombay. Great flying, taking off in a Tiger was a lesson by itself, you had to look way sidewards almost fully, to keep the aircraft straight till of course the tail came up, and then the tiger off by itself.


Kenneth Ball, e-mail, 18.02.2011 03:42

I learnt to fly in this aircraft at the London Aeroplane Club while an apprentice at De Havilland Aircraft Co. A joy to fly.


Robert Stenton, e-mail, 16.01.2011 07:26

Please can you tell mewhere to get just the Plans to build a 20 inch wingspan, Tiger Moth


Ennis Pipe, e-mail, 11.11.2010 03:03

My father was an instructor in the TM in Rhodesia during the war. Lovely little airplane and I still have a photo taken by him in a formation of TM's.


Vincas, e-mail, 27.09.2010 10:03

I just buit this aircraft 1:1 scale replica using Chech Walter M-332 140 HP engine.Lithuanian Airclub until 1940 soviet invasion had 1 Gipsy Moth and 2 Tiger Moth's.I built registration number LY-LAM.Airplane flies great.


Tom Gilliland, e-mail, 31.08.2010 14:51

Back in the fifties when my dad was farming in hill country adjoining the Strezleckie ranges of Gippsland, Australia, the only feasible economical method of applying fertilizer was by aerial cropdusting. He hired the services of an ex-fighter pilot who had bought a surplus DH82 Tiger Moth which he converted to carry superphosphate. Initially he operated from an airstrip on the nearby plains, but then he had an airstrip built on the side of a hill. I have since moved away from the region but when I went back for a visit just recently, I was amazed at how little room he had to operate from. Since the strip sloped slightly downwards I imagine it would have helped in giving him lift, still not much room for error! About a year ago,while travelling from the Gold Coast to Brisbane, I saw a Tiger Moth being flown by a joy ride operator. He put it through such intense aerobatics it left me speechless!


Stephanie, e-mail, 09.08.2010 22:45

What is the estimated value of the DH 82-C? Country and year of manufacture, respectively: Canada, 1941


Geoff Alcock, e-mail, 07.02.2010 00:23

During World War II my father worked at Burnaston Aerodrome, near Derby, which had a whole hangar full of Tiger Moths. I sat alone in many of them and "flew" them in combat missions without even leaving the building or staring the engines. Imagine today if a child tried to wander into a hangar alone. Back then flight staff would wander in and be amused at seeing me sitting in the planes.


Gordon, e-mail, 17.09.2009 10:12

3 view draeins of a moth are available at the fo;;owing sitehttp://membres.lycos.fr/wings2/3vues/3vues.html I havee just downloaded them. Have a look.


shlomo orbach, e-mail, 03.09.2009 00:04

DEAR MR. ,IS IT POSSIBLE TO GET A SET OF DRAWINGS FOR A DH82A, WE WOULD LIKE TO BUILD THIS AIRCRAFT.
REGARDS


Jock Williams, e-mail, 07.04.2009 23:18

My sons and I operate a DH82C Tiger Moth (C-FDGC) which I have owned since 1969. It is based in Dunnville Ontario at the former RCAF 6SFTS -a Harvard school from the days of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP).
The Tiger moth is quite demanding to fly -it needs a lot of rudder to coordinate turns -and on the ground with its high centre of gravity and narrow track gear the possibility of groundlooping is always there. Nonetheless -it is a joy to fly -and probably the single best training plane that was ever designed -on the theory that if you can fly a Tiger -you can most certainly master anything else.
Modern airforces could do a lot worse than to adopt this aircraft and this strategy. Think of the millions of dollars that could be saved!

Jock Williams




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