North American T-2 Buckeye

1958

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North American T-2 Buckeye

With a requirement in 1956 for a multi-role jet trainer, the US Navy awarded North American a contract to build its North American NA-241 design, which combined proven components and equipment from earlier aircraft manufactured by the company. Ordered as the T2J-1 (later T-2A), this trainer combined a wing derived from the FJ-1 Fury and the control system of the T-28C Trojan with a single 1542kg thrust Westinghouse J34-WE-36 turbojet, and accommodated the instructor and pupil in tandem, seated (eventually) on zero-zero ejection seats. The first of six initial production T-2As was flown on 31 January 1958 and deliveries to the US Navy began in July 1959, by which time the name Buckeye had been allocated to this trainer. Equipping US Navy Training Squadrons VT-4, -7, -9 and -19, a total of 217 T-2As was built. Two were modified to serve as YT-2B prototypes, in which the single J34 turbojet was replaced by two 1361kg thrust Pratt & Whitney J60-P-6 turbojets. The first was flown on 30 August 1962, being followed by 97 similar T-2B aircraft. Final production version was the T-2C which introduced General Electric J85 turbojets, preceded by a single YT-2C prototype conversion from a T-2B. A total of 273 was built under US Navy contracts, comprising 231 T-2Cs for navy use, plus 12 T-2D and 30 T-2E aircraft procured for Venezuela and Greece respectively.

North American T-2 Buckeye

Specification 
 MODELT-2C
 CREW2
 ENGINE1 x General Electric J85-GE-4 turbo-jet, 13.1kN
 WEIGHTS
  Take-off weight5978 kg13179 lb
  Empty weight3681 kg8115 lb
 DIMENSIONS
  Wingspan11.63 m38 ft 2 in
  Length11.79 m39 ft 8 in
  Height4.51 m15 ft 10 in
  Wing area23.70 m2255.10 sq ft
 PERFORMANCE
  Ceiling13535 m44400 ft
  Range1465 km910 miles

Comments1-20 21-40
William Cain, e-mail, 22.02.2020 23:24

my dad flew the t2j in saufleys vt-12, crashed oct 1960
at eglin field 6
mom said he loved it. anyone out there who flew with him

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Howard Daniel Rollins III, e-mail, 14.06.2016 17:00

Back in March of 1976, I was in Navy ROTC. Lieutenant Fane was my TI. at Prairie View A. & M. University. We took a bus down to Corpus Christy, Texas. Boarded several prop planes, I was handed over the controls by my pilot and had a ball. We flew over Refugio, Alice & Julian relatively small Texas towns located near Corpus. Response was just about what you'ld expect "Slow", but fun. We flew out to Riverside to El Toro Marine Air base in California. It is now a ghost town these days. I was the only student that did not crash the jet pilot simulator test. I went up with flight pro Jerry in a T2 Buckeye. We went up above hard deck to about 30K Feet. I loved the way that baby handled. The Trimmer control was sweet. The Pressure suits expanded all around my bodies as we made steep banks and various maneuvers. We flew from California back to Texas, and then back to California. I enjoyed inverted flight and will carry my experience with me for the rest of my life. I later joined the Air Force, unfortunately they made me an MP Security Specialists and I no longer did much more flying. I am near sighted and you can only be a pilot if you have 20 /20. Only navigators can fly with less than excellent vision. I have always loved Airplanes since I was about 5 years of age. My Great Grandmother "Alice Mathews", worked for the owner of The Gulf Coast Airport also known as the Wages Airport off Palmer Highway and loop 197 near the 29th Street North area back in the early 60's. She would take me to work with her there, and I would sit out in the yard across from the air field with the owner who was known to all as "Happy Wages". We would watch planes take off and land all day long.

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Theresa, e-mail, 10.08.2020 Howard Daniel Rollins III

Hello Mr. Rollins,

I am the local history librarian in Texas City. I am trying to find more information regarding the Gulf Coast Airport. If you happen to know anything I would appreciate it.
Kindly,
Theresa

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Chris Snider, e-mail, 18.01.2016 22:54

Started in VT 21 or 23 just before the Buckeye's arrival, spent the first three months in Beesville doing training on them, I was an ADJ and was quick to QC on as much as I could. Control tower for our area for "Hot Brakes" and parking assignments was until the fist shipments arrived. Great Times on such a easy engine to maintain. Loved the Midnight HotSpot run up checks. Sorry to hear it is all gone.

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Chuck Hall, e-mail, 23.07.2015 20:37

I was in VT-23 from 75-79, I remember Vernon Nicholes and some others, CO Troutman etc... I was a ADJ, a PC and worked in the power plant shop. I just wanted to say Hi!

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Rich Colby, e-mail, 15.07.2015 20:21

T2J-1 Buckeye - S /N 148190 - This was my first training flight, November 28, 1960 Instructor Lt. Lange, VT-7, NAS Kingsville, TX

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VERNON NICHOLES, e-mail, 30.10.2014 21:07

I was a jet mechanic [ADJ]1975 to 79 Loved working on the guppy.I remember all the great at VT-23 Kingsville would love to reunite with all the old freinds.

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Ralph D'Amico, e-mail, 06.11.2012 18:50

I flew the T-2 out of VT-26 Beeville TX (Now a Prison)in 1976-77 I also carrier qualified oin it on the USS Forrestall.. The Lady lex was out for repairs... I loved the High flying, slow moving multi engine jet trainer, I still do actually.

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Steve B., e-mail, 17.09.2012 21:52

I had the good fortune to work on and fly in (back seat) As, Bs and Cs in the early 1970s. I was an ADJ in VT 19 Meridian, MS. The pilots let me take the stick quite often. They wouldn't let me take off or land but they did teach me some aerobatics. Most of the instructors were fighter or attack pilots rotated back from Nam. I think these were the absolute bravest people I have ever met.

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j p harris, e-mail, 17.06.2012 02:03

would any one have some info on starter /generator,part numbers,mfg etc. even a source to procure a couple. think a few a /c are in civ hands. do we know owner n number of a /c. any info /leeds that would help to tracking some down.
thanks

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Pete Roberts, e-mail, 22.05.2012 04:09

Flew the War Guppy 75-77 in VT-23. Lots of memories of a solid, safe airplane and great folks to work with and for. I recall CDR Troutman with respect for his leadership, sense of humor, and his Silver Star award while flying A-6's.

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David H, e-mail, 14.05.2012 18:50

I was in VT-23 from 1977-1979, Seat Shop. I gave a lot of the seat checks to the new flight trainee's. CDI & night shift supervisor last couple of years. Went back to NAS Kingsville in 2009 and it is so run down, the barracks is a lot of offices.

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Tony, e-mail, 09.05.2012 21:01

VT-23 was my first squadron, I was an AO3 when I left. Those old GBU-3 /A gun pods were great fun. Big aircraft Ma Duce inside. We were the "Professionals". Sorry to see the old T2-C retired as well as the squadron.

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Tony, e-mail, 09.05.2012 21:00

VT-23 was my first squadron, I was an AO3 when I left. Those old GBU-3 /A gun pods were great fun. Big aircraft Ma Duce inside. We were the "Professionals". Sorry to see the old T2-C retired as well as the squadron.

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Pamela R Crum, e-mail, 08.11.2011 04:05

I was stationed in NAS Pensacola in 1966. I worked at VT-4 down the hanger from the Angels. Was enlisted and was fortunate to fly with my division officer Lt Pashall. We flew the T-2 over to the gunnery field. What a trip! 18 and fresh out of school. 45 years. Whew!

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Polly Schmidt Parsons, e-mail, 02.06.2011 20:52

CDR Troutman I remember you also...I was a yoeman in the schedules upstairs with that civilian guy "Big Dude". Was in there scheduling flights with students and instructors with Lt Paul Worley and Lt Dave Peterson....

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John Meyers, LT, e-mail, 24.05.2011 20:58

A terrific all-around aircraft. Durable, too - as I learned flying over a winter ocean with a FOD damaged engine that gave no instrument, visual or flight indication but had to be changed prior to another hop. A VT-7 instructor from 1966 to 1968, I flew 1500 hours out of Navy Meridian learning more than I taught my students about flying. Blessings on thee, North American Aviation!

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Alan L., e-mail, 12.04.2011 03:38

Remember well my 2 NFO training flights in the T-2A -loved the 4G break on approach. How many people can say their first jet aircraft flight had ONE engine?!

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Adam Novak, e-mail, 18.12.2010 06:41

I was with BTG-7 in Memphis when we got the 1st Buckeye, we were operating T-28's & T2V's then. The squadron moved to Kingsville (southside)and became VT-7. I was with the Airframe Shop and was lucky to get to draw Flight Pay due to one of four of enlisted men selected to fly with each aircraft that came out of a maintenance check. I still have my OMIAS (Order of Military Instantaneous Accelleration Society) card given for the ejection seat ride. Great Fun !!!! The squadron moved to Meridian, Miss and was split up into VT-7 & VT-9. I stayed in Kingsville and went to VT-21 with the F9F-8T's. Great days and I really enjoyed the Navy. Spent 30 years with Trans World Airlines and am still with the FAA after 20 years. Aviation is the only way to go.

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Jerry Leynes, e-mail, 26.11.2010 18:03

I will never forget my first jet flight in the venerable T2-A in Basic FT at McCain field at NAS Meridian. What a kick! Came back later as an Instructor pilot in VT-7 and accumulated several hundred more hours as a Basic Instructor. The B and C models had great performance. I once flew a XC in a C from NAS JAX to NAS MER with Cdr. Lee Goewy, the new VT-7 Skipper and me a lowly LtJg and I was the Pilot in Command since Cdr Goewy was not yet qualified in the ac. No pressure on the lowly JG! In that bad weather it was great to have the Skipper along with all his years of experience, it made a trying flight much more comfortable! Trying to get VFR "on top" of some bad weather @ FL 410 we were still in the soup but the AC performed flawlessly. Great birds, only problem was we had to teach spins in the thing and even on a good day those things were a bitch. You were coming down hill like a free-falling Mosler safe, and students invariably went "progressive" on their first one...very scary.....but for God's sake please don't tell 'em we would really do this for free! What fun!

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Steve D., e-mail, 20.10.2010 19:41

I was stationed at TRARON 23 (VT-23) at NAS Kingsville Texas from December 1973 until June 1977. I worked in the Seat Shop, Inspection Branch and Airframe Shop. Became a CDI and dual engine turn qualified, also got certified for aft cockpit and did some flying. The Buckeye was a great plane and very forgiving of many things...except bad pilots. Capt. Troutman was my XO /CO (then CDR Troutman) at VT23. I got out of the Navy in 1984 as an AMSC.

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1-20 21-40

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