Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer
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JIM MILLER, e-mail, 08.04.2020 04:42

Bob, call me ASAP. I AM VP-28 SQUADRON HISTORIAN, REUNION PLANNER FOR PB4Y-2 PRIVATEERS, 1948 TO JUN 1952. WE HAVE HAD SEVEN (7) NAJOR REUNIONS IN VEGAS, AND FIVE (5) "MINI" REUNIONS ACROSS THE US

WARM REGARDS, JIM MILLER


JIM MILLER, e-mail, 18.03.2020 02:27

MIKE TURNER, CONTACT ME, I MAY BE ABLE TO GIVE YOU SOME INFO ON SHIRLEY TURNER. I HAVE TWO BOOKS ON VPB108, WITH STORIES AND PICTURES.
TELE; 816 761 8724


VAnce Kirkpatrick, e-mail, 01.09.2017 05:58

I transferred from Kwajalein to ATU 600, about. January 1954. I worked on a check stand for a few weeks, went to plane captain school and was then assigned a plane and was a plane captain. Later we flew the 4 Ys to Arizona for storage and was assigned to ATU 601 and a P2 V 2. I was discharged 10 12 1955 and went back to California., went into law enforcement. I had started learning to fly when I went thru AD A school at NAS Memphis.I ended up flying airplanes and helicopters on the job , we had probably the largest police air unit in the nation.
After 34 years on the job I retired. ONe of the best things I ever did was joining the Navy in 1951.


Tom Dailey, e-mail, 04.05.2017 18:16

Uncle Bill - William J. Smatla AD(j)-1 ret was plane captain on several - at Hutchison NAS (KS) they trained French Aeronavelle pilots & crews to fly the acft. in Fr. Indochina (Vietnam). Later went into P2Vs, but always like the "Lib"... but said working on them in the Winter was brutal. Fair Winds & Following Seas - Tom, former RMC USN (the only "blackshoe" in the family!)


Klaatu83, e-mail, 07.09.2016 16:16

Although designed as a high-altitude strategic bomber, the B-24 had proved to be equally effective in the roles of long-range maritime patrol and Anti-submarine warfare. The PB4Y was essentially a B-24 optimized for the maritime roles. The most obvious in external differences were that the supercharged high-altitude engines of the B-24 were exchanged for un-supercharged engines optimized for operation at lower altitudes, the belly gun turret was deleted and large side blisters added both as observation posts and gun platforms. The single tail fin was a feature that had already been developed for a version of the B-24 that was never placed into production. Of course, inside there were a lot of other changes made to adapt the aircraft from operation by the AAF to operation by the Navy.


Dan Otto, e-mail, 28.06.2016 20:01

My dad, Bob Otto, was the tail gunner on the Daisy May and was awarded the DFC for the actions detailed in the painting "Blue Raiders Triumph" and was also awarded the purple heart when wounded on Tinian. I have many pictures my dad took if anyone wants to see them posted.


Zech Falcon, e-mail, 12.02.2016 20:40

My grandfather was with VBP-116 (Blue Raiders) on the "Worrybird" serial #38960. I would love to hear from anyone who has information about his crew.


Scott Dykstra, e-mail, 21.11.2015 18:35

My grandfather flew the consolidated PB4Y-2 in either VPB 120 OR 122 out of shemya. His name was Jerome Bolda though he liked to go by Jay. Please contact me if you have served with him or know someone who did. My email is apache1747@gmail.com thank you.


Marty, e-mail, 28.09.2015 03:16

There was a crash of a PB4Y Privateer on May 1, 1945, piloted by Lt J.W. Holt. It was shot down after doing a strafing run on a Jap garrison just outside Lingshui, on Hainan Island in China. The bodies were recovered in 1949. That location is in the jungle about 1.5 km from my house. Somewhere there is a website with the crash location on it. Can anyone direct me to that website?


steve piper, e-mail, 08.08.2015 15:17

Hello...Yankee Air Museum is restoring Buno 59876 in the markings of ATU-12 during the lard '40's. Does anyone have pictures or offer help with markings and insignia? Thank you


Ken Hayward, e-mail, 02.08.2015 05:39

My father in law, Robert J Britton, was on board a Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer when it was forced down by bad weather at night in 1947. The aircraft crash landed at Barin Field,near Foley Alabama. My father in law was the only person injured, sustaining a very serious gash to the palm of one hand. He always praised the skill of the pilot in saving everyone's lives. We have pictures of the crash and some of the crew, but have no idea how to find out about the incident. We would like to find out as much as we can about the crash.Does anyone know where we could look for that information?


John Evans, e-mail, 03.07.2015 13:09

My Dad, John Evans, was with Crew M-26 of VPB-197. He was a radioman and trained in PB4Y-1 and then went to Pacific where he flew on PB4Y-2. This was from late 1944-1946.
His flight log listed many Bureau #'s but mainly #59636 & 59666.
Would love to hear from anyone regarding this.
Roadstarpony@yahoo.com


Jack Wing, e-mail, 19.06.2015 18:43

Flew as a radioman in VP-22 in 49-50 out of NAS Barber's Point Hawaii. Transitioned to P2V-4's when Korea broke out.
Great and reliable plane.


Mellinda Baillieul, e-mail, 03.05.2015 03:28

My dad, then Lt. William M.Miller, flew with VPB-116 "Blue Raiders". Received Navy Cross. Would love to hear from anyone still around who knew him. He passed away in 1965 when I was only 16. Melinda Baillieul


Dan Karraker, e-mail, 02.05.2015 04:11

My Dad flew as a plane captain, (flight engineer?) in Korea in the early 1950's. I believe he was in VP 9. His name was Larry Karraker. He didn't talk alot about his experience there, would love to hear from anyone that has any information. Thank You.


Hank Rausch, e-mail, 07.03.2015 01:56

Enlisted in January 55,graduated boot camp Apr55, went to NAS Glenview. Wanted to fly. Became an on the job (OJT) striker/trainee for the Radioman-Gunner rate [Aviation Electronicsman (AL) rate] which was disestablished in late 55/early 56. Flew as top gunner/2nd radioman in rear compartment. Don't remember BuNO, but flew on #203. Plane had large red stripe completely surrounding rear of plane with name "GLENVIEW" in white letters amidships. Tail (rudder) letter was "V" indicating Glenview. Main function was training/maintaining skills of multi-engine crews and the aviators attending CIC school at Glenview. Wentto Hspital corps School at Grt.Lks. in Jun 56 and returned to Glenview in Dec 56. All PB4Y-2s gone, replaced by P2Vs. There is a Privateer being reconditioned at Chino Airport/Museum, CA and there is another one still owned by the Navy on the bottom of Lake Washington, Seattle WA (ran off runway at NAS Sand Point). Retired Jun 85 as a MACM.


Dick H. Smith, e-mail, 02.02.2015 00:49

I was a co-pilot, VPB 122, Shemya, Aug.6.- 1945-Sep.2, 1945.
Plane commander Ham Dawes. Good flying ship! Weather, excellant. I'm 94 yrs.


Curt Bronson, e-mail, 19.11.2014 14:49

My grandpa Dave Bronson was the pilot of the PB4Y-2 bomber
The Miss Sea-Ducer. He was with VPB-116. I have his flight log books and alot of information about him and his crew. If anyone has or wants information about it feel free to contact me.


Steve Piper, e-mail, 09.10.2014 19:42

ps, my email is seabee261526@gmail.com


Steve Piper, e-mail, 09.10.2014 19:41

Hello, Yankee Air Museum is working on 59876 and will be marking her as a training unit out of Corpus Christi. Time frame will be 1947-1950. I was hoping someone can help with accurate markings and locations for a Privateer from one of the training units that was based there. Please contact me with any information or photos from this time period. Thank you very much. Steve


Norm, e-mail, 18.08.2014 02:58

Oct. 1951 FASRON/101 NAS Quonset Pt. newly-wed AT-1 recalled from honeymoon, to be part of 1st detachment flying to Keflavik, Iceland; to establish the new FASRON 107. My task: set-up /supervise new Radar Maintenance Shop- & live in a Quonset hut; without Bride of ~ 6 weeks! Bah Humbug !


Matt Costantino, e-mail, 17.07.2014 04:45

My fiance's grandfather was Ens. John A. Childers with VP-106 the Wolverators in 1945. He told a story about having to land his plane on Hainan Island after losing 2 engines. If anyone recognizes the name or the incident, please feel free to reach out. Thanks!


Scott, e-mail, 03.06.2014 21:28

Wow, that automatic spell check can really mess things up, sorry.
We're looking for any information on the Privateer that Jen's grandfather was in during the Marcus Island raid on May 9th, 1945. Bureau #54444, we think. Plain was nicknamed the 'Liberty Hound'. James A Brumley, Jen's grandfather, was the radio operator and was killed when there Privateer was shot down and crashed into the sea. 5 survivors were rescued by the USS Julleo several hours later. Any help or comments would be greatly appreciated. These men deserve to have there story told and receive the honor they so richly deserve.


scott, e-mail, 03.06.2014 21:08

Great sight. I'm helping my girlfriend write a book. Her grandfather was a member of VBP-108 and was shot down during the Marcus Island raid May 9th 1945. He was aboard the 'Liberty Hound'. A privateer piloted by Ltd Commander Muldrow, who also parishedo in the attack. We're looking for any retrenchment to the 'Liberty Hound' or James A Brumley. Thanks to all. Scott


Bob Silverbeg, e-mail, 01.06.2014 02:31

correction: it was November 1945, not '43 as in my prior note.


Bob Silverberg, e-mail, 01.06.2014 02:29

In November of 1943, we left Okinawa on our way back to the States aboard a PB4Y2. It was on Thanksgiving Day '43, and our Thanksgiving dinner was a can of Vienna Sausage.


John Preston, e-mail, 30.05.2014 20:56

I was a combat aircrewman with VPB-116 flying raids against the Japanese home islands out of Iwo Jima.from May 1945 until the wars end. We shot down 2 Zero fighters in Suruga Bay on Aug 4, just 2 days before the Hiroshima bomb.I and my crew were awarded the DFC and five Air Medals over the several months in which we also flew anti sub patrols over the huge fleet which was forming for the invasion. Must have been a thousand warships and two thousand freighters. Looked like land on the radar!


Judy Couvillion, e-mail, 22.05.2014 06:09

My uncle, Myrton Ebright flew one of these during WW II. I know little about them but would love to hear from anyone connected to Myrton during WW II. Myrton died in 1980 so I can't go to him for information.


Charles R. Wirt, e-mail, 01.04.2014 04:11

For Theodore I. Myer, my dad flew with VU-2 at NAS Chinco 1946-47, safety pilot in drone F6F's primarily as Ensign, possibly Lt.J.G., Dares E. Wirt. He is now retired near Atlanta GA from Lockheed & USNR, VA/VF-672. He & my mother rented a small cottage on the island, separated from active duty, completed Ga Tech, then back with USNR. Never flew PV4Y's, but I will look up his logbook if you are interested.


Steve Piper, e-mail, 20.01.2014 18:00

Does anyone have any pictures or information on the markigs of Privateers based out of Corpus Cristi late '40s, early '50s timeframe?


Curt Bronson, e-mail, 05.01.2014 22:24

I am the grandson of David E. Bronson the pilot of the PB4Y-2 VPB-116. I have alot of information, photos and storys about members of the Bronson crew. Charles l thomas, i would really like to answer some questions. 502 876-7978


TJ Meyer, e-mail, 15.12.2013 15:49

I work for NASA at Wallops Flight Facility, formerly Chincoteague Naval Auxiliary Air Station, and have been collecting stories and photos from former Navy servicemen who were there from 1943-1959. I would be very interested in talking to anyone who trained, flew or worked at Chinco.


TJ Meyer, e-mail, 15.12.2013 15:42

I work at NASA Wallops FLight Facility, formerly the Chincoteague Naval Auxiliary Air Station from 1943 - 1959. I have been collecting many photos and stories of servicemen who trained, flew and worked at Chinco. Please contact me and I might be able to connect you to some photos and former servicemen.


Bill Fann, e-mail, 12.12.2013 18:05

My Father Served in the Pacific during WWI. His plane was the Long Island Belle He was a wing leader and a waist gunner. He went by Red and was on Tinian,Leyte and served with CASA Su 9. Does anyone remember anything about this plane or crews(s?)


John Bradford, e-mail, 02.12.2013 23:15

I was privelged to fly both the PB4Y-1 LIBERATOR (Army B-24J), about 1400 pilot hours, and the PB4Y-2 PRIVATEER, about 900 pilot hours. I've noted mistakes in this segment of the internet calling the PRIVATEER a "Navy B-24", it was not! I felt that the 4Y-2 was a nicer flying bird than the 4Y-1. With all the extra armament, it was quite formadible-looking.


Einar Widerberg, e-mail, 18.07.2013 14:09

i read in a Norwegian Air History magazine about a naval Privateer which was shot doen by Soviet fighters off the coast of Latvia 8 April 1950. Later two Swedish reconnaisance aircraft were also shot down (1952). This resulted in a new project in order to get important military information from the USSR: sending ballons from Norway, they followed jet streams across the USSR and China and were picked up by the Americans over the Pacific.


Albert B. Southwick, e-mail, 11.05.2013 19:53

I was a copilot on a Privateer, Squadron VPV 120, stationed on Shemya Island in the far western Aleutians in early 1945. I am 93 years old. Terrible flying weather!


Neil F. MacDonald, e-mail, 11.05.2013 01:03

My oldest brother, ADJC Murdoch A. MacDonald USN (Ret.) was a crewchief on PB4Y1s & 2s. He was in VD-1 and VB-101. Out doing photo recon in the Pacific during the war. He is 91 now and lives in Phoenix. His e-mail is fidsco@gmail.com I'm not usre if he keeps up with his e-mail. You can e-mail me and I will let him know. Man, he had some close calls. He went into AJ-2 Savages after the war.


HAL EMITT SR, e-mail, 27.02.2013 08:01

I AM 87 YEARS OLD & WAS ASSIGNED TO VPB 107 IN 1944 WHICH WAS LOCATED LAST @ CROWS LANDING CALI. THIS SQUOD SERVED IN THE EUROPE THEATER EARLIER IN WW2 & WAS PREPARING TO GO TO THE PACIFIC. I WOULD LIKE TO TALK TO ANYONE WHO WAS ASSIGNED THERE


Craig Munschy, e-mail, 23.01.2013 08:58

My father Louis Munschy flew PB4y2 during the war. He was in VPB-123. He would love to hear from anyone that may remember him. He also was in an B24 that crashed just off of Hawaii while being ferried. Shortly after the crash he was flying Privateers overseas....(559)243-6688...All of you were so brave and we are proud!!!


Walter Motz, e-mail, 09.01.2013 00:42

I used to fly in these out of NAS Columbus OH. VP692.


H. O. Hall, e-mail, 12.12.2012 17:11

Flew as first radio for LtCmdr J. f. Curran (1944-5) Hutchinson, San Diego, Palawan (VPB 111-117). Great guy, good crew, good aircraft. He and my replacement went down all hands in March or April -46 in PI.


michael turner, e-mail, 04.12.2012 13:19

My dad, Shirley Turner, was a chief gunners mate in VPB108 19Jan45-31Aug45 and served in Peleliu,Tinian,Iwo Jima,Tinian,Ioo Jima. His DFC medal papers list 25 missions and installatio of 20 Millimeter canon in place of bombsite. He died before I was smart enough to ask him about his service. I would love to have any information on which flight crew, which PB4Y, crew mates,pictures? Any information would be so appreciated. I would reimburse for picture copies or other cost. A side note to all who served I am in awe each time I read an account of the heroic service of each crew member and their bravery. Thank you!


Tom Dailey, e-mail, 22.11.2012 18:26

Uncle Bill - Smatla, William J, AD(j)1 USN (ret) was a plane captain on Privateers. Flew out of Hutchison, KS, Puerto Rico, & antisub pats over NorLant. I grew up hearing the stories. Artist Joe Militch of Denver did a series of terrific pen & ink drawings of it - I bought him one which hangs in MY living room, now. Tom Dailey, RMC USN (the only "blackshoe" in the family!)


david L. Wilson, e-mail, 15.11.2012 01:14

My husband was there when this took place on Guam and can tell you all you need to know about the accident and will be glad to taqlk to you. Either by email smwsew@aol.com or you may call and talk personally if perfered...918-857-1740


Mark Baker Jr, e-mail, 22.09.2012 20:02

My Dad was a tailgunner and radio with VPB122 he had orders to go to the south pacfic he was sent to Aleutians.My father is telling my brother and I some of his times when he was there,about the missions and of the great freindship he has made with his crew,he also told us about good the aircraft was.I have a model of the PBY4-2 that Iam building for him and my self of unit.
From one veteran to all the WWII vets thankyou for your service to this country


William R. Dalton, e-mail, 03.08.2012 10:19

My Dad flew the PBY4 somewhere in England in 1944. He was an Ensign and the a JG. He transferred over to the Air Force in the 50s and flew the B26 . He would be 88 today. He lost his life in April of 1957 while piloting a B57A based at Eglin AFB Fl.. The crash was based on engine failure and severe weather.


Steve Stringer, e-mail, 01.07.2012 16:01

My uncle was aboard a PB4Y-2A, Bureau Number 59777, that disappeared on 30 November 1945. It had departed NAS Kodiak bound for NAS Seattle. Their last position report placed them in the vicinity of Sitka. Then nothing. The search revealed no sign of the aircraft. If anyone has more information on this incident I would appreciate you sharing it with me.


John Sizemore, e-mail, 07.06.2012 23:05

ADR2John W. Sizemore, I flew as a flight engeneer in the mid fifties patroling the East Coast from Newfoundland to Key West searching for Russian ships and submarines. Attached to VP? out of Floyde Bennett Field, Long Island, NY. Throughly enjoyed my experience so much that I ended up retiring with forty one years experience.


HAL EMITT SR, e-mail, 05.05.2012 07:52

I FLEW IN SQUADERN VPB-107 AND WOULD BE PLEASED TO HEAR FROM ANYONE WHO SHARED THIS FLIGHT EXPERANCE.!!!


Charles L Thomas, e-mail, 19.04.2012 18:18

My father, William(Bill)L. Thomas, flew with VPB-116 as the starboard waist gunner on a PB4Y2. He was first stationed on Iwo Jima in April 1945, then his unit was pulled back to Tinian around June or July. He was a member of Bronson's crew. (I assume Bronson was the pilot.) My father passed away in 2001. I have a number of pictures, including one of his crew receiving the 'Air Medal' in front of a PB4Y2 with the nose art "Miss Seaducer" on it. (I don't know if that was his ship or they just used it for the photo op.) Does anyone have any more information about Bronson's crew? Some of the pictures I have are of his crewmates in Honolulu in front of the King Kamehamea statue. Thanks!


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Malcolm Barker, e-mail, 14.01.2012 03:32

PB4Y-2 BU 59819 being restored at LSFM in Galveston is in my navy log a few times while in VPB-120. Our regular plane was BU 59745.


Jill Altoft, e-mail, 15.12.2011 07:13

my father, Ralph A. Finley, was, I believe, the first pilot of the PB4Y-2 bomber during World Was II. He was in the Navy, Unit 111, and the tail number of his plane was BuNo 59569. Can anyone give me information on this particular plane, or where it might now be?


Bill Fann, e-mail, 01.12.2011 21:54

My father was a gunners mate on a Pb4y2 in the Philipines during the war
He went by "Bugger Red" will look up his squadron info and post later.

Sound at all familiar to anyone? Thanks to all who have served!


Hal E Emitt Sr, e-mail, 05.11.2011 06:30

I WAS ASSIGNED TO VPB-107 SQUAD -RETURNED FROM EUROPE AND REFORMED ON WEST COAST. WE WERE @ WHEDBY ISLAND, ALEDMEDA, AND CROWS LANDING - NEAR MEDESTO CALIF. THE JAP WAR ENDED WHILE WE WERE PREPAIRING TO GO TO THE PACIFIC. THIS WAS A GREAT AIRPLANE! I WAS THE FRONT GUNNER AND BOMBEDEER. YOU COULD DROP A BOMB IN A BUSSEL BASKET -WITH THE NEW RADAR BOMBSITE !


Carroll Cook, e-mail, 31.10.2011 19:16

My father was a member of VP-24 during the early 1950's, which flew the PB4Y-2. I am curious to know if anyone might have a picture of buno 59763. He told me that he made a lot of flights in that aircraft. I have a general idea of how the aircraft was identified at the time, Squadron ID on the tail, but the ship number on the the forward fuselage is unknown.


William J. Smatla, e-mail, 28.10.2011 20:08

Uncle Bill was an AD(j)-1 later on, but was crew chief on PB4Y-2's. Often said they were his favorite, although he was in P2V-7's as well. Worked with French AF pilots at NAS Hutchison (KS), readying them for service in French Indo-China, which we came to know as Vietnam. I still have the trailing-wire antenna crank-reel from one, in my radio shop, in addition to a BC-348Q receiver from a PB4Y-1.

He was my hero, and so were those crews.

Tom - former RMC, USN


Ron Sathre, e-mail, 17.10.2011 19:36

17 Oct '11

This is a great site and one that helps promote connections between PB4Y veterans, aviation fans and relatives.

My father, CPO Ray Sathre, flew in WWII as a Plane Captain in "Mr. Kipp" a PB4Y-2 Privateer in VPB-121. He finished the war on Iwo Jima with his squadron. My dad died in 1989. This promoted me to start the Int'l PB4Y Association and the PB4Y All Squadron Reunions in 1991. CPT George Charno, my dad's PPC, died a couple of years ago in Kansas.

I was happy to see two of my friends, Richard Jeffreys, VPB-121, and Christine Stulik, father was Martin Usab VB/PB-108 and a PB4Y Reunion attendee, listed here.

I own Privateer "Charlie 50", Bureau #59763, which crashed in AZ in 1974. It is the last known Privateer to have had actual combat time in WWII.

If you are interested in talking about the PB4Ys, making connections or getting in touch with other PB4Y folks, perhaps I can be of help. Feel free to call me (510) 487-PB4Y (7249) or email me at PB4YGuy@aol.com.

My thanks goes out to all those PB4Y veterans (air and ground crews) who served our country so well. With the way things are going now, we could use their good their good sound judgement today.

Best Regards, Ron


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Jack Millaway, e-mail, 20.09.2011 01:19

I was attached to ATU 12 in NAS Corpus Christi, TX. In 1952 the squadron moved to NAS Hutchinson and the squadron was renamed ATU 600. I was stationed in Hutch until October, 1953. I was an AM and worked on and flew in PBY4-2 aircraft. I flew every time I could catch a hop. The Most memorable time for me was sitting in the glass enclosure in the nose watching for aircraft during instrument flight training.
One time our crew had to pull one of the aircraft out of the mud at one the auxiliary runways. From a mechanical standpoint, it seems we were continuously dealing with the check valves in the landing gear system.


Jeanette Rivett, e-mail, 02.09.2011 20:16

Would like to talk to Dan Sisto who posted a comment on here. I am looking for any information on this plane he was on. I have a friend who was a pilot on this kind of plane from 1946 to 1950. A model of this plane is being made for him, and am trying to create it as close to the plane he flew. I can be emailed at jrivett2003@aol.com.


Kenneth Claypool, e-mail, 04.08.2011 22:06

I was a crew member on PB4Y2's flying patrols from Palawan Is. in the Philippines. We had engine trouble and landed on Hianan Is. off the coast of China. This was just after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan, and the Island had been secured. The plane was repaired and flown back to Palawan. Squadron VPB-106


jim lyons, e-mail, 11.07.2011 21:16

My Dad was flight engineer stationed in teh Aleutians during the war. They started with PBY's then went to PV-1's (Harpoons) then on to the PB4-Y by war's end. Believe he was on Attu and Kiska. Same name. ANybody know anything?


Jack McClain, e-mail, 11.06.2011 00:35

I had a somewhat remote association with the PB4Y2 back in 1944. I was part of a small detachment of Army Air Corp people stationed in the Camp Kerney Auxillary Naval Air Station outside San Diego, CA (later known as Miramar NAS I've been told.)
The main aircraft on the base was the PB4Y-2. I never flew in one but enjoyed seeing them take off and landing. I believe their mission was recon patrol of the West Coast.
I had come to that base from Maxwell Field, Montgomery, AL.
At that time on that base were B-24s (PB4Y-1). To me there
was quite a contrast between the two aircraft... especially the twin tail of the B-24 vs the single tail of the PB4Y-2.

I've enjoyed all the comments!

Jack McClain (90 years old!)


WILLIAM R. PRESTON(BOB), e-mail, 17.05.2011 04:15

I JOINED VP-28 IN NOV 1948 AT KANEOHE NAS, HAWAII. WE DEPLOYED TO GUAM IN JAN I949 FOR SIX MONTHS. WHILE WE WERE ON DEPLOYMENT, VP-28'S HOME PORT WAS CHANGED TO NAS BARBERS POINT HAWaii. I flEW AS CO-PILOT FOR JIM GOODMAN FOR MOSTOF THE 1949 DEPLOYMENT BUT MADE PLANE COMMANDER IN MAY BEFORE JIM COMPLETED HIS TOUR OF DUTY AND DEPARTED. I INHERITED CFF-9 WITH A FINE CREW. WE DEPLOYED AGAIN TO GUAM IN JAN 1950. MY PLANE CAPTAIN WAS CPO WILSON. WE HAD A VERY SUCCESSFUL DEPLOYMENT AND WERE IN THE PROCESS OF PREPARING TO LAUNCH ALL SQUADRON BACK TO BARBERS POINT ON 25 JUNE 1950 WHEN THE KOREAN CONFLICT COMMENCED. NONE OF OUR AIRCRAFT WERE AIRBORNE BUT IT WAS VERY CLOSE TO LAUNCH TIME WHEN WE WE RECEIVED THE WORD FROM COMNAVMARIANAS (CFAW ONE TO STAY ON GUAM AND PREPARE FOR FURTHER DEPLOYMENT TO OKINAWA. THE SHIP WITH OUR GROUND CREWS AND OTHER PERSONNEL WERE WITHIN ONE DAY'S SAILING TIME FROM HAWAII. THE POWERS TO BE ALLOWED THEM TO LAND FOR ONE NIGHT AND THEN TO REEMBARK AND RETURN TO GUAM. 75 OTHER MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL AND LT BOB LANKFORD WERE AT APRA HARBOR, GUAM IN THE PROCESS OF BOARDING A MARS FLYINGBOAT FOR THE FIRST EVER FLIGHT OF THAT KIND FOR DEPLOYED VP PERSONNEL. THEY WERE STOPPED IN THE PROCESS AND SENT BACK TO NAS AGANA.TO JOIN THE REST OF THE VERY DISAPPOINTED FLIGHT CREWS. A NIGHT OR TWO LATER, CF-9, MY CREW, WAS LAUNCHED AT AROUND 2Q00 TO CHECK OUT SEVERAL STRANGE SIGHTING OF SUBMARINES OR UNIDENTIFIED LIGHTS IN THE GUAM AREA. THEY LOADED US UP WITH WW11 DEPTH CHARGES AND WE SPENT THE NSXT 9 TO 10 HOURS SCARING THE DAYLIGHTS OUT OF MANY FISHERMEN IN THE AREA BY MAKING BOMBING RUNS ON THEM WITH SEARCHLIGHT ON AND BOMBBAY DOORS OPEN. NEEDLESS TO SAY, WE FOUND NO SUBMARINES. WE LANDED BACK AT AGANA JUST AT SUNRISE WITH A VERY TIRED CREW. WE SUBSEQUENTLY DEPLOYED ABOUT TWO-THIRDS OF THE SQUADRON TO NAHA AFB IN OKINAWA AND COMMENCED THE FORMOSA, NOW TAIWAN, STRAITS PATROLS. WE RIGGED A LOT OPF SHIPS BUT SAW NO SUBMARINES. ONE INCIDENT INVOLVED CF-1 WITH BOB KIRSCHNER IN COMMAND WHO WAS FIRED UPON BY A PAIR OF CHICOM JETS BUT DID NO DAMAGE AND DID NOT PRESS THE ATTACK. WE RETURNED TO NAS BAR BERS POINT IN AUG 1950 AND THAT WAS SUPPOSED TO BE THE LAST PB4Y2 DEPLOYMENT TO WESTPAC. MY TOUR ENDED IN JAN 1951 AND I DEPARTED FOR LINE SCHOOL IN MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA. I LOVEDTHE PB4Y-2 AIRCRAFT AND WOULD HAVE TAKEN IT ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD WITH A 5000 FT RUNWAY. I HEARD LATER THAT VP-28 DID DEPLOY AGAIN AS FLARE OR PHOTOFLASH BOMB CARRIERS. I WAS A NEIGHBOR OF LT BILL CAMPBELL IN THE EWA HOUSING IN AND KNEW HIM WELL.


Paul Worley, e-mail, 10.05.2011 21:12

My father-in-law was a navigator with VPB-108 1943-45. Does anyone have any log book entries or information on Richmond Neale Lt (jg) he may have gone by Dick Neale.


Jon Kreple, e-mail, 23.04.2011 01:42

Saw jonny fritz comment above. My Uncle Peter J. Kreple was radio operator on the flight of July 18, 1945. What VPB squadron was this plane assigned to. Found one entry that the plane was a PB4YW. What does the "W" signify. Is there any info on the incident, radio transmissions, last known location, etc. Thanx!


Harry Buttner, e-mail, 14.03.2011 00:33

worked on these things at corpus Christi Texas 1949-52. We had 40 of them. Pilot training encluding French for Nam.


uncle mac, e-mail, 10.03.2011 21:20

Good grief, flew this thing at Pt. Mugu target Dept. early 60s. caus I wanted to. The pilot was an E8. Land on the back side of the wheels, he said and I finally did, 13 times. back to F8s and A4s. great fun!


George Widly, e-mail, 02.03.2011 05:36

GEORGE WIDLY, TAIL GUNNER

I was in VP-9 in 1952 we had three PB4Y-2's assiged to Kunson(K8) during the Korean War. I flew 23 all nite flare drop missions over North Korea. Mostly we would search for supply lines; however, duringt moonless nites
we would lite up the enemys front lines all nite.
A great airplane but as a tail gunner it was brutally cold in the winter.


Paul Gaertner Jr, e-mail, 01.03.2011 01:09

This is one of those "For What Its Worth" posts. Wife and I have special interest in PB4Y-2s in that her dad served wuith VP-122 during last months of WW2.
Privateer followers might like to learn the the a/c owned by the National Museum of Naval Aviation is in the process of restoring their a/c. I suspect engine nacelle reconstruction will be included as the plane was a fire-fighter for some time and as such had R2600s as mentioned earlier.
Would be interesting to learn about the plane at the Yankee Air Museum in MI.


Maurice Shapiro (Shep), e-mail, 19.02.2011 12:52

My favorite duty in the Navy was with VP-871. Joined squadron January 1951. Stayed with squadron when it changed designations to VP-19. Transferred to NAS Alameda in 1954.

PB4Y2 was excellent aircraft and served missions in Korea with great success. Men who flew the Priveteers distinguished themselves by dedication, bravery and patriotism.

I am proud to have served with them.


Albert Malouf, e-mail, 05.02.2011 05:35

I was co-pilot and navigator to the skipper, Lt. Cmdr. John Muldrow. He was flying with another crew on the morning of May 9, 1945 when they were shot down on a morning attack on Marcus Island. His crew was not on Standby that morning, but he always said he would lead the attack. Not a May goes by that I don't think about him, a great skipper and leader.


william muttera, e-mail, 02.02.2011 04:44

I was assistant crew chief on PB4Y-2K, a radio controlled aircraft VU-3 out of Ream Field south of San Diego in 1954. Crew chief was a man named Zigler. Rode around the traffic pattern with aircraft flown by radio control (with safety Pilots). Had one trip to White Sands, N.M. with 12 on board, all enlisted men. Great aircraft with very few maintenance issues.


DAN SISTO, e-mail, 27.01.2011 01:26

I WAS A STARBOARD WAIST GUNNER IN THE PB4Y-2 DURING THE WAR. I DIDN'T SEE COMBAT ONLY PATROLED THE SOUTHERN COASTLINE SEARCHING FOR SUBS. A GREAT PLANE AND GREAT EXPERIENCE. I JOINED AT 17, AM NOW 83. FOR THOSE INTERESTED, PUERTO RICO MANUFACTURES REPLICAS OF THIS PLANE. A CLOSE FRIEND OF MINE WAS KIND ENOUGH TO ORDER ME ONE FOR MY 80th BIRTHDAY. I LOOK AT IT OFTEN, AND BRINGS BACK SO MANY WONDERFUL MEMORIES.


Russ, e-mail, 25.01.2011 21:22

Hundreds of these came back to the states from the Pacific during 1947-8. Fasron 111 at Miramar did a minimum of work to enable them to go on to Texas where they were restored. They came back to Fasron 111 like new. We checked everything over, put in lastest TO's and flight tested them. Ferry crews flew them back to Kanehoe. I suppose they were dispatched to other Pacific locations.


Richard Schwaller, e-mail, 24.12.2010 23:56

I enjoyed my multi-engine training in the P4Y-2 at NAS Hutchinson,Kansas
A total of 162 hours which included cross country and instrument training flights. Sure was a nice big bird.


Bud Thomas, e-mail, 24.12.2010 22:01

My uncle flew on PBY4 Privateer " Little Joe" in 1945 out of IWO. His commander was Merton T Ebright- co pilot was Lawson, John Chambers. My uncle is 89 and we would like to hear from anyone with ties to patrol squadron 108.
thanks, Chuck & Janice Pearson, Libertyville, IL.


CHARLES FARRY, e-mail, 21.12.2010 05:45

My late dad was a crew member (right waist) on PB4-Y2 in the south pacific in 1944 PATRICK HERNY FARRY if any one knew what unit he was with please let me know. He LOVE THAT AIRPLANE and love to be around them as a ground mashaller E.A.A.


Lee Branch, e-mail, 21.12.2010 03:25

Anyone have the title of a recent and most interesting new book concerning air crew lost in training withn the U.S. during WWII

The author, a 'wreck hunter' by avocation,has found many B-24 wrecks where the tails had obviously separated prior to impact. Among his statements was that the landing gear upon contact with the ground , created vibrations, harmonics of which ultimately caused deteroriation of the fuselage structure supporting the twin tailed empennage. The knowledge he obtained was obviously derived from military crash analysis studies.

Consolidated~ and the U.S.A.A.C.~ must, then, have known of the problem. Reasonably, the order for the single tail variant as ordered by the U.S. Navy must have taken this design weakness of the dual rudder version into consideration when they specified a single rudder version~


Rudy Park III, e-mail, 12.11.2010 00:11

I hesitate to comment out of respect to the honorable men referrenced above, serving our country. However, I did have the privilage to fly all but 2 of the remaining PB4Y-2's for 8 years out of Greybull, WY, fighting fires. This was, indeed, a fine aircraft. We modified these aircraft with the primary modification being the replacement of the engines to R2600-35. This modification really made this aircraft perform!


Jim Newhall, e-mail, 08.11.2010 10:34

My Dad, CDR. James W. Newhall, flew Privateers out of NAS Agana Guam starting in August 1953, with the primary mission of weather reconnaissance. He was the skipper of VJ-1 squadron (later VW-3), and was lost with his crew of eight on 12-16-53 while chasing Typhoon Doris in aircraft BuNo 59716. The squadron had a 50 year reunion in Oct 2003, including a nice memorial service for their squadron mates, which my wife and I attended. Any info about this squadron or personnel would be much appreciated.


Steve Stout, e-mail, 04.11.2010 20:54

I have an old picture of my grandfather. He took a pic of the plane. His name was Richard Hinzpeter. If you know anything about him, please respond. Thanks.


Captain James E. Wise, Jr., US, e-mail, 27.10.2010 02:59

Went through Hutchinson, commissioned with wings. Joined the last navy squadron (VP-24)to fly these birds. Great aircraft, reliable and easy to fly. We flew a few of these to the French in Vietnam (stayed at the Majestic hotel in Saigon, a beautiful city in those days), also deployed to Agentia, NewFoundland and made frequent trips to Thule, Greenland. We converted to P2V-6 aircraft and were given the mission of mining and ASW.

Cheers to fellow "Batmen"

Jim Wise


Dennis Scranton, e-mail, 26.10.2010 06:13

I flew with skipper John Muldrow VPB-108 until he was killed on low level raid on Marcus Island. May 1945. I finished the war with another pilot Riffe. I wrote a book called "Crew One," about my service available at Merriam Press Bennington Vermont or on Amazon.com. Christine Stulik, I flew one mission with your Dad training the nav and radioman in the use of both the radar and Loran gear. A handful of us are still around and on email.


Robert Maxwell, e-mail, 26.10.2010 04:13

Fascinating airplane. I used to take rides on one when I was stationed at the Coast Guard Air Station, San Francisco, in 1955. The interior of the fuselage was large and roomy, like a single-wide mobile home. Great view from the tail gunner's position, replaced by a large, clear plexiglass bubble with a simple metal bicycle seat in it. The catwalk between the bomb bays was about a foot wide. It was possible to see down through the slight openings directly to the Pacific Ocean some thousands of feet below. Training flights were a little unnerving when the pilot feathered one of the props to get the feel of the airplane functioning on only three engines. But all of it was thrilling.


RICK PARADISE, e-mail, 25.10.2010 11:35

MY DAD WAS PILOT/CO-PILOT OF LA CHERIE. #489, HE ALSO
FLEW SEVERAL OTHERS. BUT THIS WAS THE BEST ONE. HE FLEW
A DIFFERENT PALNE BACK HOME, BUT CRASH LANDED AT BARBERS POINT. ALL SURVIVED


Joe Vaughn, e-mail, 23.10.2010 08:54

My Dad flew as a starboard waist gunner aboard PB4Y 489 "La Cherie", assigned to squadron 105, flying from Tinian. He was awarded three air medals and the Distinguished Flying Cross while assigned to this aircraft.


Bob Murray, e-mail, 21.10.2010 04:33

I took my multy engine training on this plane in Hutichison, Kansas in 1953 prior to getting my Navy wings.


jonny fritz, e-mail, 21.09.2010 19:05

My Uncle Robert Bostrom was on a flight in a PB4Y-2 out of Miami 7/18/1945 for a training flight that never came back.
Was it typical to have as many as 15 people on a flight like that for training?


D.V. Wesselmann, e-mail, 15.09.2010 16:09

My dad V.H. "Vince" Wesselmann was commander of a FB4Y2 in '44-'45 Pacific Theater. I have his log books and some wonderful silk maps that he was issued. His stories about low level Tsushima Strait patrols and the '45 Okinawa Typhoon (140 knot winds according to the plane's avionics - they had the bird chained down at the time) were riveting. His crew chief was the comedian Georgie Jessel's brother and there are some notes about his anxiety during the hop to Tinian with a "sub-par" navigator. He loved that plane.


Calvin Pierce, e-mail, 14.09.2010 20:56

I was second radioman in crew 8 VP 772. We flew patrols from Iwokuni across Korea in the Yellow Sea area and north out of Atami Japan along the Russian coast. Our crew with Lt. Hurley as PIC flew flare drops (Lamplighter)missions. Being the smallest on in the crew I carried the flares from the bomb bay to the afterstation crew who were in charge of dropping the flares.


Kevin Mason, e-mail, 12.08.2010 05:47

My Dad,a marine, flew pb4y's,doing recon missions over
many of the islands in the south pacific,have his log book but he never mentioned anybody's name he flew with,anyone
having more info about his crew and time there would much
appreciated, his name Sgt Edwin S. Mason. thx


Chester Keene, e-mail, 10.08.2010 04:47

My wife and I found one of these planes in the Everglades being used as a hunting camp. It had no wings or tail verticle stablizer and elevators were missing. It was built up on a concrete block structure. We took a picture of it in 1986.We think it was trucked in from Miami.


Jim Dexheimer, e-mail, 04.07.2010 20:49

Just found out that my Dad, Harvey Dexheimer of Wisonsin, and his buddy, Merthan Ellis of Idaho, flew on Privateers out of Guam in 1944 and 45 as radio operators and top gunners. They were better known as Dex and Lucky. Merthan's last flight overshot the runway and crashed into the baseball backstop. He was slightly injured. Does anyone remember flying with them?


Bill Fann, e-mail, 01.06.2010 20:16

My Father served in WWII on a pb4y2 from 1943-45 class m-23-w was wondering if anyone knew him he was a wing leader section one seving in the pacific theater known as "red" Wilmer Fann was his name.


Bill Fann, e-mail, 01.06.2010 20:15

My Father served in WWII on a pb4y2 from 1943-45 class m-23-w was wondering if anyone knew him he was a wing leader section one seving in the pacific theater known as "red" Wilmer Fann was his name.


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John Reid, e-mail, 30.04.2010 05:33

My Dad, Whitelaw Reid, was a captain and flew an PB4Y2, up to Saipan and Tinian, and many other areas. Had many stories. One was also about running out of gas while taxying off the runway. One story he did not tell but at his funeral a crew mate told me, that they were the first US plane to land in Japan after the end of the war. Apparently they faked mechanical problems, and a broken radio to land, just to be the first in. Said they were well taken care of by the Japanese, and flew out 1 day later. Not sure why he did not ever talk about this. Maybe couldn't tell his son about disobeying orders like that?? Said he loved the plane. Was sad to leave it when he was discharged. His crew met almost every year up till 2009 when he died at 94.


James Murphy, e-mail, 18.04.2010 00:13

My Dad Elbert L. "Lance" Murphy flew PB4Y out of England, VPB-109 or 110, not sure. He was with Lt. Reedy who later became an Admiral and with Joe Kennedy Jr. Any info about his squadron will be greatly appreciated.


christine stulik, e-mail, 12.04.2010 08:27

My Dad Martin A. Usab flew on the PB4Y-2 in the Pacific with VPB-108 mostly flying forward reconnaissance for Bull Halsey's third fleet I believe. He worked as a draftsman/engineer for Consolidated Aircraft and knew the aircraft well, and so served as a "Plane Captain" and a waist-gunner. I was able to attend one reunion in his stead. They spoke of "Whitecap Specials" as missions. Have his Medals, citations, log book and Squadron Book and photos for my grandchildren. His aircraft was "Nippo Nippin Kitten." Crew 11 and 13. VB and VPB-108 has an amazing history as does the PB4Y-2 as firebomber later in its history.


Robert Smith, e-mail, 10.04.2010 16:01

My dad Frank C Smith was a tail gunner on the Navy PB4Y2 , had some great stories!


Richard Jeffreys, e-mail, 04.04.2010 01:15

I was 1st radioman and top turret gunner (VPB 121) on this aircraft. I also flew as a crew member (2nd radioman) in a B-24 in VD-1, but liked the privateer better... Both aircrafts got us back to the base safely after several "Combat missions".....

Jeff


Conry Clemens, e-mail, 20.03.2010 23:23

My grandfather, Lt. (j.g.) H. Donald Clemens, was a co-pilot with VPB-106 on 4Y-2's during WWII. I'm named for another co-pilot, Ens. Edward Francis Conry, who was MIA on a patrol to the Gulf of Siam.


A.SCHIANO, e-mail, 14.03.2010 21:07

I WAS A PASSENGER FROM HICKUM FIELD TO CANTON ISLAND IN THE ELLICE GROUP IN 1944


Capt. R. Bruce Campbell, USN (, e-mail, 12.03.2010 01:44

A PB4Y2 from VP28 left Barber's Point NAS one night in 1948 or 9 bound for NAS North Island via NAS Alameda. Plane Commander was AD1 Kirshner, co-pilot Lt. Bill Campbell, 1st Navigator was another first class petty officer who's name I've forgotten, and the 2nd navigator was Midshipman R. Bruce Campbell. The plane captain was a chief petty officer. How's that for a motley crew? We had some serious icing problems approaching San Francisco (a PB4Y2 glides very poorly) but we made it. Returning to Barber's Point in a newly overhauled plane, we left Alameda at dark and returned to Alameda at daylight five nights in a row having been called back approaching the point of no return by Commander Fleet Air Alameda because the wind factor forecast was faulty and we would not have made it.


Richard Herbst, e-mail, 30.01.2010 19:32

Just found a 1942-45 logbook of my dad's (Lt Fred Herbst) with a lot of PIC time in PB4Y2s and just about anything else the Navy put behind a prop. His last year of service, flew with Ferry Sqadron 3 out of San Pedro. Crew names include Lts de Brruniops, Leach, Brand, Gates, Duke, du Bose, Bergy, Taylor, Thweatt, Wingerd, Miller, Hecker, others. Log includes all AC serial numbers.
Richard


James B. Totten, e-mail, 28.01.2010 16:31

Went on my second tour to Kanehoa Bay , Oahu NAS, Dec.
1945, with the Exec's PB4Y-2, which was disbanded soon after
we arrived. The plane was new. I was a AMM 3c, tail gunner.


Robert Stewart, e-mail, 25.01.2010 21:31

While in PBY Sqd.VPAM3 I went to aerial gunnery school at FAETU lant and had the the privilige of flying several hops in the Erco turrets. 1947


Roy Canales, e-mail, 25.01.2010 04:55

I knew Terry Palmer's father and flew with him as Radio/Radar operator in Navy Patrol squadron VP-28 in 1951. Lt. Bill Campbell was PPC in PB4Y-2 CF-4, Bu.No. 59738.
We flew firefly (flare drop) and bombing missions at night over North Korea, in coordination with Marine Grumman F7F fighter bombers. Our call sign for these missions was "Fat Face". The mission was to destroy military truck or train traffic. PB4Y-2's were designed for anti-sub and long range sea patrols but were pressed into combat over North Korea because of long flight endurance and it's load carrying capability, some missions lasting as long as 6+ hours which may have been a record for sustained flight over North Korea. Other PB4Y-2 squadrons involved were VP-772 and VP-871.

I have kept up with the restoration project of the PB4Y-2 at Galveston and a few of years ago, my ex VP-28 squadron mates and I contributed a sum of money toward the project. Unfortunately, the Lone Star Museum in Galveston was severely damaged by a hurricane during which some 8 ft. of water flooded the hangars including the one housing the PB4Y-2.


ken simpson, e-mail, 24.12.2009 04:26

My Dad, Albert William Simpson. was a WW11 PB4Y-2 pilot, anyone know him? I sure would like to hear from anyone that knew him.


Mike Moyer, e-mail, 03.11.2009 19:02

That's my Dad flying that PB4Y-2 with the mountains in the background.He was Lt.jg Russell Moyer PPC.He was in VB106 and Vb109.I have his log books and tons of photos . He picked up D67 at the Consolidated Factory. It was destroyed in a Japanese suicide attack while parked on the ground. That attack has been well documented. Write me if you want more info.


Bob Jacobsen, e-mail, 24.09.2009 05:22

I checked out of VB-4 early 1946. 35 men died in a two plane collision practicing fighter evasion south of Eglin AFB. I was scheduled for that flight as instructer,the 36th man. This got national newspaper attention. I would appreciate any newspaper clipping that anyone still has.


Tom Dailey, e-mail, 23.06.2009 00:55

My Uncle Bill (William J. Smatla, AD(j)-1, USN ret. flew as crewchief in many of them. Antisub patrol over NORLANT,knowing that if the fans quit turning, it was all over due to the very cold water off of Greenland.

I just got through donating the Homelite APU that every one of 'em carried, to the Combat Air Museum in Topeka, KS. I lost Bill 2 years ago, and it was his favorite toy. Got to start one up in Graybull, WY- what a rush.

Tom - former RMC USN


Ken Swick, e-mail, 19.06.2009 00:13

The PB4Y2 at the Lone Star Flight Museum in Galveston, Texas is about half-way done. The engines, gear and skin are on. I was there 2 months ago and saw the wiring was being run through the wings to the engines. The vertical stabilizer is an awesome sight as it towers over everything. I can't wait to see this thing fly.


Brian Billington, e-mail, 18.04.2009 04:53

My Dad flew in the first pb4y2 squadron in the south pacific during ww2.VB118. talk about stories. Mining harbors around Korea, and the japanese outer islands.14hr. missions.Bone of the Being one of the first airplanes to land on Iwo Jime, and having Marines pop their head into the bomb-bay doors asking for caned fruit or anything, which they gladly gave them. To mining a harbor and having a shore battery fire at them, the pilot flies behind a small island and the shore gun lobs shells over it ,trying to hit them.Came back after a bombing and strafing run on a ship with 180 bullet holes in the plane


Dave Bosomworth, e-mail, 06.01.2009 19:50

Flew the PG4Y-2G in 1956-1960 a Coast Guard version for Search and Rescue. Had extra fuel tanks in the bomb-bay could stay aloft longer than you wanted too. First and only aircraft I flew that had 360 degree radar. Cranked down radome in the belly after take off. Great visibility for searching big picture windows in the waist compartment where the machine guns had been removed along with seat in the nose for a forward observer. The Coast Guard replaced this a/c with the R5D and later the SC130B


Tom Glass, e-mail, 26.07.2008 21:29

The single vertical stabilizer was for better low level stability which the Navy did often. I toured one at NAS Memphis. VP-9 P2V vet, 1956- 1959.


Tom Glass, e-mail, 26.07.2008 21:28

The single vertical stabilizer was for better low level stability which the Navy did often. I toured one at NAS Memphis. VP-9 P2V vet, 1956- 1959.


Terry Palmer, e-mail, 23.04.2008 19:42

My Dad (Martin Palmer) flew as an aircrew member on these birds in Korea. His Aircraft Commander was Campbell and he has some great stories...1) running out of gas after leaving the active runway after a longggg mission, 2) How much damage can your own .50 cal empties do to your own plane? 3) Returning from Hawaii with more beer than fuel, 4) Candlelight missions with depth charges on truck convoys in valleys, 5)How strong are your cable connections? 6)Classified missions to ____ involving fire hoses...and so much more!

There is a PB4Y2 being fully restored by the Lone Star Aviation Museum at Galveston Tx. Get on their site they have some other great birds also!

Enjoy!

Terry




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