North American T-28 "Trojan"
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Don Drouin, e-mail, 05.03.2020 15:39

I flew the T-28 at Spence Air Base (AB),a civilian field near Moultrie Georgia, in 1959 for Primary training. Had a civilian instructor, Wilton B. Hodges. Ex WW II Navy pilot. Said I’d never forget his name. I didn’t.
Always knew when it was final approach. Wilton B. (“Mr. Hodges to you mister.”) would have me open the canopy so he could throw his cigar out.


Ted Voulgaris, e-mail, 20.03.2018 02:13

Does anyone have any information on 1st Lt. Dan Moss who was a flight instructor at Whiting Field in 1957? He was a close friend and squadron mate of mine in VMF-214 at MCAS Cherry Point. When VMF-114 was reorganized I went to Chase Field in Texas as a jet flight instructor and Dan went to Whiting Field, Pensacola as a flight instructor. He was killed in Oct of 1957. If anyone knows the circumstances of his accident, I would hear like from them. I have been trying to find out what happened for many years. Thanks for any info. --Ted


LT Buford Suffridge DC, USNR, e-mail, 17.02.2018 22:10

For Don Jenkins who posted a comment in 2016. I know Jigger Owens and can put you in contact with him if you so desire. bjsuffridge1@gmail.com


LT Buford Suffridge, DC, USNR, e-mail, 17.02.2018 22:05

I served as a dental officer at Whiting Field, March, 1969-March, 1971. Got to fly a time or two in the T-28 over the objection of squadron commanders who wanted a student in the back seat if the Trojan was in the air. One of the flight instructors, LT Kevin Buckley, was a patient of mine and talked his CO into allowing me to fly with him. I recall during the preflight briefing, LT Buckley telling me if he said to bail out to go immediately or I'd find myself riding alone. I'd love to know what became of LT Buckley. I heard a lot of flight b.s. but my favorite was: "you know your gear is up and locked if it takes full power to taxi to the ramp."


Eric Krask, e-mail, 11.02.2018 00:38

Class 23-56 North Whiting my first dogfight (unauthorized) ended with T-28B wrinkled wings. Strike A/C in report and SPD board for me. Capt. John Lynch, USN saved my ass and career. Went on to VMF-235 FJ-3M and F8U-1E. Then to Delta in 1961 for 35 years. Now 82 and waiting for final call. ekrask@hotmail.com


John Rees Sr, e-mail, 28.08.2017 08:51

For Chris,
My first 13 landings as an SNA were in 138178 on Feb 24, 1981 while I was attached to VT-27. My email is papalangelus@gmail.com


ron upton, e-mail, 05.05.2017 07:13

AT3 assigned to intermediate maint fixed hundreds of ICS boxes and ARN 1 ADF...and arn14 VOR recivers...70 t0 73...never got a ride in anything except a uh1 one time lol... had to join the reserves to get some P3 time good times...


Bill Brown, e-mail, 12.03.2017 02:11

Bud I have a picture of "your" T-28 at VT-3. I agree best flying ever


Kenneth C. Karas, e-mail, 17.02.2017 00:43

HI, this is for the Museum editors: The aircraft with the arresting gear was designated the -C, not the -G as indicated in the writeup. Also worth mentioning was the "Fennec" used by the French.


S. T. (Woody) Cowles jr., e-mail, 08.02.2017 06:40

I was a 3rd Class ADR with VT-2 NAS Whiting Field. I was one of two power plants trouble shooters. In 1970 I was in two T28 power plants training films that the Navy made at VT-2 Whiting Field. The squadron acquired both films so I could see them before I got out of the Navy in January 1971. I can't find these films on line. Does anyone know how I can show my sons these films?


Terry Hobbs, e-mail, 17.12.2016 20:24

I was a board boy at VT-2 flight 5 formation from May 1967 until April of 1969. I posted the next days schedules on the flight board and assigned the aircraft. Some one named Chris said his father owns a T-28 that had the number 217 and thought it was from VT-3. Actually we had 217 in VT-2. VT-2 and VT-3 were both at NAS Whiting Field.


don jenkins, e-mail, 17.12.2016 09:47

I worked in the formation ready room as boardboy. I put the flight opps skeds up for next days flights. I also put
myself on the board and have about 300 hours back seat time. I flew every day, mostly with LT jigger owens.


AM-1 Penrod USN Ret., e-mail, 09.08.2016 03:53

My first job was as a plane captian at VT-30 Corpus. Had AD-6s, T-28s, T-34'S in the summers. Always has a class of vietnam nam students. Had turn up card on all 3. Usually had least 10 or more 28s. Got a lot of stick time while instructor graded his students in ADs. Good bird


CDR Dave Smith (ret), e-mail, 08.06.2016 08:14

I began my Naval Aviation adventure in Aug.1977 in the T-28 as a NIFTS student. This means that your first(primary) training aircraft was the 1425 HP T-28! Ignorance is bliss! I didn't know you were supposed to begin your flying career in something a little more tame. What an aircraft, my favorite! When I got a chance to come back to VT-27 as an instructor I jumped at the offer. I was lucky enough to be there in 1984, when the last T-28 was recovered from the last training flight. No student that completed training at VT-27 during 1984, in the T-28, failed to earn their Wings of Gold! What a plane and what a squadron. The best instructors in the Navy and many life long friends! You know who you are. We witnessed "The End of an Era". Trojans and round motors forever!


William E Platt, e-mail, 30.12.2015 01:40

Naughty Tanga Nomad
By: William E. Platt

I named her Tanga Nomad, she said I flew her best,
I wanted to believe her, so she flew me to her nest...

I fell in Love with her radial jugs; nine, and hot for hugs,
Her empennage so sturdy, her rudder spanking bugs,
Twin fifties graced her shoulders, six hard points above her knees,
I love a girl who dresses tough and wants to please not tease.
Her mysteries, mine for asking; her contours, a joy to see,
She wanted a daring pilot, now; She knew that he was me.
Again, daring pilot, come and fly, be free.
In the sky together, you and me are we.

Yes, I named her Tanga Nomad; she said I was her best.
I needed to believe her, and so did all the rest


N D Brown, e-mail, 28.10.2015 21:47

Navcad Class 38 59 I flew T28 at Whiting. After T34 at Saufley I felt I was in a real Navy airplane .. and then it ate my lunch. On safe for solo check hop I discovered that holding exact heading and altitude while dropping everything to make plane as dirty as possible didn't get me extra points when I pulled her nose up and fell off into a spin. It took mine and the instructors muscles to pull it out. I was so rattled I got lost. End of Navy Wings of Gold dream. but I don't blame the aircraft!


Richard Newfield, e-mail, 19.08.2015 01:33

I completed primary training at Spence In 1956. I was in the T-34/T-28 program. Flying the T-28 was the most fun I ever had. I recall landing, after the pitch out, using nothing but trim tabs. I absolutely loved that aircraft, particularly during aerobatics!


Bill Lawton, e-mail, 24.02.2015 03:53

T-28B was the perfect transition aircraft from the SNJ in basic training to the F9F2 in advanced training in Kingsville, TX 1955. The only Navy plane which was more fun to fly was the FJ-3 Fury!!


Dr Richard Dexter Olson, e-mail, 04.02.2015 22:49

I `54- flew this airplane for Instrument Flight Training at NAS Kingsville TX, from Aug`54 through Sept `54, GREAT AIRPLANE. Would love to hear from anyone who was there at the same time.


Karl Polifka, e-mail, 24.01.2015 03:47

I got a 4 hour check-out in the T-28D at Udorn RTAFB in 1969 and then did 300 combat hours (plus O-1 time) as a Raven living in near the PDJ in Laos. A good stable airplane for ordnance delivery and the two .50 cal were great fun!


Hal Cusick, e-mail, 23.01.2015 21:04

Enjoyed the T-28A, envied the Navy for their B models with bigger engine. Nice cross country, cavernous baggage comp. Only airplane I ever flew that was able to do a loop on top of an immelman. Flew same at Williams Field, AZ (aka Willy)as Ip, also T-6, P-80 a,B and Tbird.


Reed Carr, e-mail, 21.01.2015 03:59

my first flight in a T-28 was at Corry Field, 1956, in the "spare" seat of a fellow student's solo. I was really impressed, after coming from Whiting and flying the T-34.


Paul (Muddy) Watters, e-mail, 13.01.2015 20:07

Whiting Field 1968 - flew T-28 for formation and instrument training. On a solo flight I decided to find put why we always had to recover from a spin after three turns - I found out quickly that after three turns the nose falls thru and spin rate increased rapidly - blacked myself out pulling 6 g's to recover but the wings didn't some off! VT-5 for carqual training. Lexington was in dry dock so our entire flight flew cross country to NAS Jax where we qual'ed on USS Wasp. Party time at the O'Club that night - early wake up the next day for return flight to Pensacola with big hangover. We were the last helicopter designated class to hit the boat before moving to Ellyson Field.


Robert "Robin" Armour, e-mail, 19.12.2014 18:31

How cool is that-
having your trainer named after a condom.


Chris, e-mail, 18.09.2014 22:15

Hello everyone. My father currently owns T-28B #138178. He has owned it since 1986. It was in VT-27 until 1984, one of the last released, and prior to that, Vt-6 and VT-3 I believe. If anyone has flown this aircraft or has any additional information on it, please contact me. I belive in VT-3, it's number was 217. In VT-27 it was 703, and at the very end, 744. Thank you.


MadMaxNJ, e-mail, 21.07.2014 05:28

WoW all these pilots, I was just the guy that had to fix these oily, smelly, Props in 1969. Was given duty station at Keesler from the Air Force as a thank you for serving in Vietnam 67/68 after I had spent all my previous 3 1/2 yrs. working on RF-4C's, Army Helicopters, C-47, RF-101,RB-66B, C-130's and trained on the B-52 in Tech school. No wonder I did not re-enlist.


Russ Dyer LtCol USMC (Ret), e-mail, 11.05.2014 00:59

I was introduced to the T-28 at NAAS Cabaniss Field in Corpus Christi in May 1954 where I spent more than 40 hours under the back seat hood learning radio instrument flying. I was a NAVCAD and my instructor was Lt Foucht, USN. (Are you still out there somewhere?) Two years later I found myself back at Cabaniss Field (then 1/Lt USMC) where I spent the next two years and 1200 flight hours in the T-28 front seat teaching radio instrument flying to a couple dozen students. (Are any of you out there somewhere?) I also had the distinction of flying the last instructional hop out of Cabaniss before it was deactivated.


Bill Frew, e-mail, 30.03.2014 18:08

Class 59-C at Spence. We were on the PT field close to the runway end and hadn't had our first T-34 flight yet. During a break we watched the T-28's pitch out and land. Suddenly one spun out of the pitch. As we held our breath it pulled out just above the treetops and went roaring off. Of course at supper a Cadet stood on his chair and told how the Mil. check pilot gave him a simulated engine failure in the pitch. He got a foot stuck in the pedals and cross control stalled. The check pilot recovered. When we first arrived at Spence we used to hear farm tractors Put, Putting in the distance. We soon found that it was the Wright engine with the split exhaust. We envied the Navy with the better engine but we loved the feeling of climbing up the flaps to enter then heard the sound of a powerful engine coming to life.One student had an engine failure after a touch and go at Tifton aux. field. Bellied in beside a road, couldn't open the canopy elect. or Air. A Georgia chain gang prisoner chopped him out with a pick. Those months were a very happy time to look back upon.


ross diehl, e-mail, 13.01.2014 00:15

I was USAF class 56B,Graham AB, Marianna, Fla, followed by the T-28A at Bryan AFB. My first ride in the T-28A was on my 21st birthday with Lt.Bob Anctil.I bought T-28A #50(49-1540) 28 years ago so I can say I have been Flying T-28s for 58yrs.7mos. Great A/C when the 3 blade Ham Std. prop is installed. Its at Chino, Calif. available for rides or sale!


Larry, e-mail, 21.12.2013 19:31

First flew a T-28 as a student pilot at Marana AB in 1954 (1955-S). Later as a check pilot for a Foreign Military Traing attachment at Graham AB in 1958 and 1959 When Castro took over Cuba the Cuban students were there one day and gone the next.Flew many aircraft but this one was the most fun of all.


Karl S. Zimmerman, e-mail, 02.11.2013 03:52

Worked as a flight Mech at NAS Whiting with VT-6; 76-80. After all this time I still smell the oil burn on first turn-up. Just like your first love, you always remember your first bird.


Carl Fick, e-mail, 29.10.2013 12:32

Was assigned to VT-2.power plant division. 68-71 Yes ADR-3. Became one of few that was CDinspector so I would have the opertunity to go on maintance hops alot. Always was a giggle on take offs when we do an unresticted climb then finish test flt. And then go put the ole' girl thru her paces. That was a Big giggle. Had a couple brown outs and gray outs. Hard to keep up with the pilot sometimes. The T-28B/C was my whole tour it was great.


Dick Baese, e-mail, 22.08.2013 17:51

I enjoyed primary training in the T-28A. The engine had an unusual sound being a 7 cylinder. However the worst sound is when it blows the bottom jug and now you have the sound of silence. Cockpit full of smoke and the windshield obscured with oil. After about 5 minutes of flying blind and getting air with the canopy open, I decided to let the plane do the rest of the flight by itself. It wasn't all over yet because me and the airplane hit the ground about the same time and place. The mechanical failure was attributed to an over haul screw-up. This all happened August 13th 1958. I completed pilot training June 10,1959


Bob Martin, e-mail, 15.08.2013 02:42

After the T-34 at NAS Saufley I arrived at Whiring Field in Nov 1959. My instructor at North Whiting for T/P/A & Basic Instruments was Marine Capt. William Robert FAILS. He was one great guy, now deceased.

With 150 hrs. to my credit I felt the T-28 and I could do anything.

There are three T-28s, one A & two Bs, two flyable, at Dallas Bay Skypark near Chattanooga, TN.


Phil Belisle, e-mail, 11.03.2013 04:32

Also a plowback circa 1957-59. My unit was the "Flying Eights", North Whiting.
Favorite was a half field abort with a rough running engine, and "instructing"
German Aviators. They had more time firing at B-17s that I had total time. Great plane and great times. Look up R-1820 in wikipedia and find out what
a grand engine history we flew.


Tom Liston, e-mail, 27.02.2013 03:32

In my post below, I meant Whiting Field, not Milton Field. Ah, the ravages of age.


Gary Dietz, e-mail, 26.02.2013 03:28

Flew the T-28 out of Whiting Field and Mainside Pensacola. First carrier qualifications were a memory never to be forgotten. Great, reliable and fun-to-fly bird.


Tom Liston, e-mail, 22.02.2013 05:06

Flew the T-28 (B & C) at Milton Field in 1962-63. Best instructor I ever had was a Marine Capt. Dawson, who had flown Crusaders before coming to the training command. Very patient and reassuring. Spent my life flying, but this was the most fun airplane of them all. Carrier quals aboard the Lex in July of '63 was the single greatest thrill of all; we damn near killed each other coming back to base, all 6 of us so high, adrenalin rushing. What an airplane! What memories! One of my proudest possessions is an exact replica of the C model I took out to the ship: tail number 140064; two touch and goes and six arrested. Forgot my shoulder harness on one and disappeared from view when the trap occurred. Instructor radioed and said, "Liston, when you get your head out of your ass, you owe me a bottle!" A debt I cheerfully paid.


John Doling, e-mail, 03.01.2013 04:01

I was the VT3 east line petty officer 1961-1962. We carefully watched oil consumption and restricted length of flights. Wright engines larger than 9 cylinder are not the best,Pratt and Whitney is much better. Flew with the best
pilot ever, Capt Richard Gleason USMC. Went down Blackwater
river and nothing was closer to the water except maybe a boat. Pilots I remember; Kelley, Deneeve, Idzi, Limbaugh,
Barkovich, Petersen, Collins. There was never a dull moment
with "Tricky Dick". Everyone that knew him has lots of stories of his escapades.


Charlie Waugh, e-mail, 12.12.2012 10:13

Pre-flight Class 19-65. Returned immediately after receiving my wings as a Sergrad and taught Basic Instruments in the T-28B for 12 months, flying four 1.3 hour hops per day as the Navy ramped up for Viet Nam. By the end of the 12 months it was like you were wearing a T-28. Very sweet airplane. Most memorable flight was my "gee whiz", first training flight for going aboard the boat. The instructor wanted to show me how safe the airplane was going aboard the ship at the really slow speed on final of 62 knots. To prove this be kept slowing the airplane down until it was flying at approximately 50 knots, (mostly on the prop). Returning to 62 knots seemed like the most comfortable speed in the world after that. Most fun airplane I ever flew.


Bob Griffiths RN, e-mail, 29.10.2012 14:38

My first ever flight was with Lt Walker USN, who subsequently became the officer who brought the T28 into the training program in Pensacola, that was around September 1953. Our term (February 1953) were the last people to go through the training course on the SNJ Harvard and the F6F Hellcat, superceded by the T28 and the F9F


Richard Russell, e-mail, 05.10.2012 07:46

I was stationed at Whiting Field 1962-1963. I am trying to track down anyone who may served there. In particular Lt. Sherman. If any one served there or knows about Lt. Sherman please drop me a line. Thanks, RR


Chic White, e-mail, 23.09.2012 23:15

Gentlemen, please tell me where and why did they name the T-28B the "TRojan"? Thank you.


CDR Foots Huston, USN, ret, e-mail, 31.07.2012 22:00

I flew the T28B/C as a cadet in 1959. CarQual on Antietam OCT 59. Later flew B model an Barbers Pt. Great airplane. Too bad so few got to bring it aboard.


Zippo, 23.06.2012 00:48

Good aircraft, i love it. Do you should have the line drawing of the aircraft and more information for the review


Zippo, 23.06.2012 00:48

Good aircraft, i love it. Do you should have the line drawing of the aircraft and more information for the review


Mark Childers, e-mail, 18.06.2012 07:25

T-28G???? what's that about? I remember Danny Dawson and can vouch for his seat and turn time. I was one of a handful of qualified outlying field mechs in both VT2 and VT6 - from Jan 68 thru April 71 - just about every day I got to fly back seat on NADEP acceptance flights, PMCFs and cross countrys to chase down and repair stranded aircraft. I recorded 236 flights and 496 hours, including one trap on the Lex in a VT5 bird, but not counting my tour as the turn guy in the Yellow Peril - the T-28 bail out trainer on a stick behind AMD. And did it for a whopping $40 a month in flight pay... Biggest problem with the T-28....every single-engine, high wing propster I've ever flown is a wallowing dog by comparison...


richard russell, e-mail, 09.05.2012 22:59

I was stationed at whiting field 1962-1963. I was not attached to a squadron. I was attached to NAAS. (central hanger) We had 6 planes on the line. 3 T-28, and 3 SNB 5s.(Beachcraft) I was a plane captian on the beach craft. I got in a lot of flying time in T-28's though. I love that plane. Pilots let me fly.
Would someone please describe the duties of the plane captian. I am trying to convince people that I was not a pilot. My job was the care and feeding my plane. ABC maintenance. I sure would appreciate this. Even the VA doesn't know what a plane capt. is.


ROBT."ROBIN"ARMOUR, e-mail, 04.05.2012 22:17

Far and away the best prop' trainer ever in the USAF inventory. Swinging that two blade prop by the radial engine was a real feel of the horses at the end of the throttle linkage. The T-28 was more of a machine than any of the jets I flew afterward or bug smashers I've flown since. Thanks to all the maintenance crews that gave me such a safe and rewarding aircraft to fly.


ROBT."ROBIN"ARMOUR, e-mail, 04.05.2012 22:13

Far and away the best prop' trainer ever in the USAF inventory. Swinging that two blade prop by the radial engine was a real feel of the horses at the end of the throttle linkage. The T-28 was more of a machine than any of the jets I flew afterward or bug smashers I've flown since. Thanks to all the maintenance crews that gave me such a safe and rewarding aircraft to fly.


Danny Dawson, 27.04.2012 18:14

Although I wasn't a pilot, but I've got tons of seat time in the T-28. I was an ADR working in check crew at NAAS Whiting Field from 1969 through 1973 in Squadrons VT-2 and VT-6. I was high power turn qualified and got to run them through their paces on the ground as well as seat time with the test pilots. I truely loved working on them. I've done so many high power runs back then I'll bet I can still fire one up today on the first try without a back fire....LOL


Luke Memminger, e-mail, 22.02.2012 04:24

I just got back from Corpus seeing my son who is in Primary flying the T34C. We went by the Hangar where I was in Primary in the T-28C in 1976. There was a T-28 on a flatbed trailer with quite a bit of corrosion. I was in the NIFTS syllabus. The Navy was transitioning from the T34-B to the T-34C, and didn't have enough, so they sent a bunch of us to Corpus for the NIFTS syllabus to fly the T-28. They said the only thing they would guarantee was that we wouldn't get Helos. I was the first in line. I will never forget taxiing across Ocean Drive with all the morning traffic stopped while I rumbled across on the way to the runway. PS: My son's comment when he saw the T-28 on the back of a flatbed at the Hangar..."That thing is huge."


FRED OSBORN, e-mail, 12.02.2012 19:57

Class 58J or K at Bainbridge Air Base, GA. First solo Beech T-34A 29 April 1957. First solo North American T-28A
24 June 1957. About 140 hours both aircraft. T-28A was fun
to fly and response was terrific. Nostalgia sets in when
spotting a USAF or USN version.


Mike Poole AMS-2 USN, e-mail, 07.02.2012 20:58

While working Line Crew with VT-3, I flew back seat (when empty, with an instructor) in the T-28C's back in 1966 though 1967 at NAAS Whiting Field. Got to fly a lot of cross county, after maintenance flights and weather hops, what a great aircraft. Left NAAS Whiting Field in 1968 to be reasigned to VP-9, NAS Moffett Field, Ca. to fly aircrew in the Lockheed P-3B, which a lot of pilots had been trained in the T-28's


Bob Mutchler, e-mail, 06.01.2012 22:09

Flew the T-28 at Marana AB, Tucson, AZ in 1956, Class 57 November. Lots of solo time after the T-34. Great instructor Walt Smith taught me how to do snap rolls at the top ends of Lazy Eights. Really a great plane to start a lifelong love of flying.


Ron Konkle, e-mail, 19.09.2011 20:18

In 1957 I flew the T-28 at Cabiness Field, Corpus Christi. 100 hours in the back seat - never soloed. One day the instructor was teaching me to do spins - hold the nose just above the buble while rolling over. After about a dozen tries, I was ready to do more but he said that was enough and grabbed a barf bag. Great plan to fly.


John Moore, e-mail, 03.08.2011 22:36

My brother was killed in a T28 crash in June 1970 while training pilots out of Pensacola Naval Air Station. His name was Capt. Earl R. Moore Jr. from Erwin NC. Does anyone remember him? He had recentely returned from Vietnam where he flew with the HMM-364 squadron. Thank you John Moore


tom walsh, e-mail, 09.07.2011 21:29

I have seen several familiar names on this site...Flew the
T-28 at Graham in 58-F and loved it. While flying one week-end at SQL 40 years later I noticed a Trojan in AF colors taking off....it was a Graham bird (same tail number
of plane I had flown several times in 1957) Got that old lump in the throat! Great memories


Jay Phelan, e-mail, 06.07.2011 22:54

My flight surgeon class (no. 123...graduating in the spring of 1970) was scheduled to train in the T-34, but due to heavy demand for Vietnam pilots, the squadrons were overbooked, so we were sent to Whiting for T-28 training. I was not thrilled, because I'd never flown anything before, but once I got over the shakes, I found that I could fly the thing, and after 12 instructional hops I was told by my off-wing instructor, "well, you won't kill yourself....safe to solo". What a rush that solo was, after waiting nearly four hours for an aircraft to become available! Never soloed a navy aircraft again, as that was our one authorized solo. Only ten of the class of 50 did solo, and eight of the ten already had their private licenses.


Ken Green, e-mail, 06.07.2011 10:01

Taking a ride in a T-28 is on my bucket list. I logged a little over 100 hours in one as a NavCad at Whiting Field in 1958. I'd be delighted to pay the expenses for a 1/2 hour or so ride in one. I'm at jascain@aol.com and live in Los Angeles.


Bill Newman, e-mail, 29.05.2011 20:11

NAVCAD Class 23-56 at Whitting Field was divided - half went into the SNJ (super navy jet) after soloing in the T-34, my half went into the T-28B. Next, gunnery at Barin Field in the Trojan, then CQ in the T-28C aboard the USS Antietam. Next, NAS Memphis and advanced instruments in the B model. I still get a thrill when I hear that Wright-Cyclone start up, idle then go to full power. I have about 800 hours in that wonderful machine and would own one if I could afford the oil bill.


Phil Thibodeau, e-mail, 22.05.2011 03:48

How to twist a T-28's tail

Navcad Class 20-55 reporting. We were the last cadets to fly the SNJ and one of the first to fly the T-28B. Remember shifting blower at @10,500'? You know, throttle back, shift, throttle up. Well, I forgot the first step in my excitement. What a hell of a thud!! but, it took it and we made it back OK.


Capt M.W. "Skip" Ward, USNR (R, e-mail, 12.05.2011 18:09

Indeed, this was one enjoyable aircraft. I was in class 36-63 and a "plowed back" after receiving my wings. I loved the maintenance check hops where I could experiment with the aircraft (ie wobbling and stair-stepping up to fl 310) or demo-ing a stall at just under 50 kts or buzzing a farmer after executing an engine out gliding procedure to a field. Ah yes, what wonderful times!


Daryl Pickett, e-mail, 08.04.2011 06:54

I flew both the B and C models during my flight training with VT-3 between December 1973 and August 1974. Wonderful airplane to fly, I remember it fondly. Loved doing aerobatics especially spins in it. Wow that first spin in the 28 after having flown the T-34B was a real eye opener.


CDR Roger L. Johnson, e-mail, 02.04.2011 01:27

I was a NAVCAD in Class 23-63, and the T-28 was by far my all-time favorite trainer. I went on to fly H-2 Seasprites and H-3 Seakings in HU-1/HC-1, and finished in HS-84 at North Island. My three WESTPAC cruises were aboard the Ticonderoga, the Enterprise, and the Midway.


RogerB34, e-mail, 30.03.2011 18:37

170 hrs T28 time. 8 paddles traps 31 Oct 1957, 8 traps "mirror optical landing system" Antietam 12 Nov. I volunteered for the test after paddles qualification. The mirror was just that - a mirror mounted in a frame and chained to the right side of the angled deck. Much easier than the paddles approaches.


Ken Jones, e-mail, 17.03.2011 03:45

I agree with most of the rave comments about the Navy
T-28B/C. After flight training I was a "plow back" instructor to South Whiting as a Red Knight in VT_3. After retireing from an airline career I couldn't afford my own T-28 so I built an RV-8A. A fun airplane and I fly a bit of formation with other RVs, but not a Trojan.


Doug Hulse, e-mail, 16.03.2011 13:55

Morning all... I am proud to fly a T-28B, BuNo 138265 now. Have owned and flown it since 2003. Great bird and I always enjoy having ex T28 pilots come up and start talking with us about the aircraft and this specific bird. Stop by and see us, normally at Oshkosh, Sun and Fun, and various shows in between!


uncle mac, e-mail, 10.03.2011 20:57

Class 7-57 Where are you? From T-34s to the T-28, an almost fighter. North and south Whiting field-Radio range instruments??? a long time ago 1957-8, thense to Barron(sp)Field and FCLP and gunnery. If one of thr 50s failed, the plane would turn sideways. Made it harder to qualify, but we did. Lots of FCLPs but no boat! Off to Chase Field and F-9s. More fun!!!


ARTHUR L. PALMER, e-mail, 08.03.2011 20:48

WAS NOT A PILOT BUT WAS IN BTG-5 BARIN FIELD FOLEY ALA.
FLEW REAR SEAT SOME IN A T-28 MADE A FEW REAR SEAT CARIER
LANDINGS.WAS IN THE NAVY GOOD DUTY STATION.THE T-28 WAS A
JOY TO FLY IN.


Bill Smith, e-mail, 23.02.2011 15:22

I first flew the T-28 for night flying and instrument training at Saufley Field, Fla. in 1956. After many hours in the SNJ this was a 'cadillac' to fly. Loved the airplane. I was plowed back after flight training to instruct in the T-28 at North Whiting Field, Fla. Had many wonderful experiences with this aircraft. We instructors would see how many hours a month we could fly in the T-28, most of us amassed 100+ hours a month. I knew this aircraft better than my car. Loved to get the WX hops..because I knew no one else was airborne. I would put on low level airshows for the crash crews at outlying fields, then land and have a cup of coffee with them. Great times. Had much rather fly than eat back in those days. I have approx. 1200 flight hours in this wonderful bird.


Mike McCombs, e-mail, 13.02.2011 15:20

Flew at VT-6 in the 70s and then came back to Pensacolaat NAS Sherman as functional test pilot for the T-28s that came out of NARF in the 80s. We also put systems in the bird and did evaluations of the systems for NARF. Of all the planes I flew, the T-28 was the most fun and most dependable. I recall one went down at Brewton Field on a training hop and everyone walked away after it plowed thru the trees. Great plane!


Ed Kopodrc, e-mail, 10.02.2011 21:16

I saw the name "John L. Krill" above and immediately took my Graham AB 58-F book off the shelf. There was Lt. Krill along with the other military check pilots (Patee, Seaton, and Williams). From my perspective as an Aviation Cadet, they were all imposing and fearsome men. Damn, those were great days! My call sign was "Gator 23". Many years later, when flying A-37Bs, it was "Vader 23". How 'bout that?


Ron Murray, e-mail, 07.02.2011 06:07

Upon graduation from the USAF Academy in 1965 I was assigned to pilot training at Randolph AFB, TX where I completed basic flight training in the T-28. Subsequently, I completed Helicopter training at Shepard AFB, TX prior to being assigned to Vietnam as a Rescue Helicopter pilot. The T-28 was an amazing aircraft to be trained in as a new pilot. The lessons learned in the T-28 have served me well in my 13,000 hour of flying since those exciting years.


David D, e-mail, 04.01.2011 03:26

Morey Butler, my grandfather was a camera operator for the Airborne Board at Fort Bragg and flew in the T-28's and T-34's in the 80's. I am looking for information as I am doing research since my grandfather passed away. I have his flight suit and a TON of pictures he took of the loads. Can you help me out?


CDR Lanny Cox, USN (Ret), e-mail, 03.01.2011 22:24

I flew the T-28B/C going through flight training in 1963-64 at NAAS Whiting Field, FL, made my first carrier arrested landing in a T-28C on USS Lexington (CVT-16) in June, and later flew it again while serving as an Instrument Training Instructor in both the TA-4F and T-28 at VA-45, NAS Cecil Field, FL 1967-70. I always found the aircraft dependable and a pleasure to fly.


CDR Jim Glendenning, e-mail, 02.01.2011 21:43

I flew the T-28 as an instructor in VT-3 at South Whiting Field, 1960-62. Taught formation and gunnery as well as flying night chase on students doing their night flying. Two years and 2500+ hours. Yes, we were operating at a high tempo. The navy was increasing the number of pilots and the demands for output were relentless.

Instructing can become very frustrating. After a year you begin to recognize that all the students make the same mistakes, and that you can almost predict what mistakes will be made and when. That can lead to being cynical and impatient. I had to fight that tendency my last year and was not as good an instructor as I was the first year.

All my fellow instructors were really great "sticks" and it was a pleasure to work with them. We flew so much that starting a T-28 was more familiar to us than starting our cars. Two or three 2-2.5 hour hops a day, six days a week really hone your skills. Many great memories of those days.


Ray McTague, e-mail, 20.12.2010 03:07

I also flew the T-28A at Greenville MS in Class 55C. Also joined the '0' airspeed club--often--as Chuck Jackwood explained. Don't remember Frank Simons, also in 55C at Greenville. Stayed on after graduation in '54 as an instructor in the T-28 and T-33 for several months awiting my next assignment.


Morey Butler, e-mail, 10.12.2010 19:50

You Navy former T-28jocks may be surprised to know that the Army had T-28s. Three were assigned to the Airborne Test Board at Fort Brag where we used them to photograph (high speed film)what ever was pooped out of Air Force cargo aircraft (C-41's and C-130's). It was the only aircraft that could orbit around around a parachuted load (man, beast,or machinery)and follow it to the ground.When the DA was high she would shake like Elvis but she would still hang in there. I loved flying that damn thing.That growling radial would get every ones attention at Simmons Army Airfield and at Pope Air Force Base. After the mission debrief I would occasionally give big airplane jocks a chance to see if they could handle her. It was like a monkey trying to fornicate with a football. My favorite show off stunt was to get an okay for a high speed ,low altitude (and I mean 10 feet over the runway) pass with a 360 overhead approach to a full stop at Simmons. I would red line her, do a 4g pull up and as airspeed got tolerable in the inverted position pop the speed brake,gear, and full flaps and then I was on the ground quicker than an auto rotation in a helicapeter from pattern altitude. Got lots of other bs stories in that fine flying machine way back in the early 80's


Morey Butler, e-mail, 10.12.2010 19:43

You Navy former T-28jocks may be surprised to know that the Army had T-28s. Three were assigned to the Airborne Test Board at Fort Brag where we used them to photograph (high speed film)what ever was pooped out of Air Force cargo aircraft (C-41's and C-130's). It was the only aircraft that could orbit around around a parachuted load (man, beast,or machinery)and follow it to the ground.When the DA was high she would shake like Elvis but she would still hang in there. I loved flying that damn thing.That growling radial would get every ones attention at Simmons Army Airfield and at Pope Air Force Base. After the mission debrief I would occasionally give big airplane jocks a chance to see if they could handle her. It was like a monkey trying to fornicate with a football. My favorite show off stunt was to get an okay for a high speed ,low altitude (and I mean 10 feet over the runway) pass with a 360 overhead approach to a full stop at Simmons. I would red line her, do a 4g pull up and as airspeed got tolerable in the inverted position pop the speed brake,gear, and full flaps and then I was on the ground quicker than an auto rotation in a helicapeter from pattern altitude. Got lots of other bs stories in that fine flying machine way back in the early 80's


Bob Nichols, e-mail, 10.12.2010 00:39

The most dangerous hop a Naval Aviator flew was returning to Saufley AFTER hitting the boat in the T-28C. I did it on the Lex in 1967 and was so stoked coming home I must have been plus or minus 300 feet in the brake. The three other guys in my flight were just as fired up. We sure thought we were cool walking into the O-Club that night.


Boob Savage, e-mail, 08.12.2010 23:06

A correction to your write-up. "T-28G" should be "T-28C".
That was the name of the Navy's tailhook version.


Mick Brown, e-mail, 24.11.2010 22:07

Check the Natops. You won't find a limit for oil consumpion. As long as she ran out of gas before running out of oil, it was an up gripe. Blindfold me and strap me in the cockpit of the T-28 and I could tell you what airplane I was in by the burnt oil smell. Great, great airplane.


Frank Simons, e-mail, 15.11.2010 17:18

I flew the T28 in Class 55c in Greenville, Mississippi before moving on tho the T33. What a great plane .. I loved it. It had flaps that looked like barn doors.


Gary Parker, e-mail, 10.11.2010 07:46

I trained in the T-28 at Moore AB, Mission, TX (1959-60. Instructed Vietnamese students at Randlph and Keesler from 1966 to 1970 in the bird. Trained Laos students and flew combat missions out of Udorn Thailand 1970-71 in the At-28D.
Great airplane. Logged over 2700 hrs in it.


Danny Ruffin, e-mail, 04.11.2010 19:07

Great airplane! First airplane for many naval aviators to land aboard the "boat". I made my first arrested landings in a T-28C aboard the USS Intrepid off the coast of Jacksonville. Then came time for the deck launch! I still vividly remember approaching the bow of the ship without enough airspeed to fly and feeling the main struts extend after leaving the flight deck!


Jim Bliss, e-mail, 01.11.2010 20:19

I wasn't a pilot but a crew chief at Keesler 1971 to 1973 then worked the T28's in Udorn Thailand for a year. I really loved that plane and can still pick one out at an air show just by the sound of the engine.


Jim Kelly, e-mail, 30.10.2010 19:51

I made 8 landings on the Antietam flying the T-28.Actually ;4traps;4T/G's &2 misses.


Jim Miller, e-mail, 27.10.2010 06:19

Flew the A model in Primary at Malden, MO, 60-F and loved the aerobatics. Great airplane. Instructor let me do the initial pitchout under the hood after instrument ride, then pop the hood and land from the back seat. What great memories.


John L. Krill, e-mail, 18.10.2010 23:15

Upon graduation from Pilot Traing in 1954, I was assigned to Graham AB, FL, Graham Aviation as a Military Check Pilot. Initially in the T-6G and later in the T-28A. As a Military Check Pilot, I conducted Cadet/Stuent Officer check rides, Civilian Instructor annual check rides and any other Standardization evaluations that were rquired.
The T-28A was a great trainer and pleasure to fly. I accumulate about 1000 hours in the T-28A.


Dallas Smith, e-mail, 16.10.2010 19:26

Class 56-A. We were the first to fly the T-28 at Spence. Then another 45hrs at Williams before going into the T-33. I learned to keep a good grip on the stick in spins. If you let the large ailerons jerk the stick out of your hand, it would nearly beat you to death. It sure wouldn't recover by itself, like the T-34.


Bud Ford, e-mail, 09.10.2010 03:17

Flew the T-28 B at Whiting in 1957. Did radio insruments and formation ...great airplane.


Raymond Ways(USN-ret), e-mail, 06.10.2010 19:46

I flew the B&C in training, enjoyed the gunnery(50cal)mostly. But it was still in the program at Test Pilot School in the early 60's where we really had fun. One clown claimed to have done a 35 turn spin, not great for the engine, but I am sure you remember that ALL pilots tend to lie alot. One of my tests required climbing above 36,ooo ft which was documented by an instrument "package". I remembered that fuzzy feeling I got because that diluter-demand O2 system was not up to the task, and I commented to our OP's people. They said they planned on taking the 30/35 band out after the next class. It was tried one more time and the pilot passed out during the flight and crashed over on the Eastern shore of MD. As a student in the 50's I do remember an old time(wwll) instructor say that he would have been terrified in his day to have been put into 1500hp as we were after 12 hrs in the T34...


bob keiningham, e-mail, 30.09.2010 13:15

Flew the '28, 58-G, StallingsAFB, Kinston, NC. Forty-five years later flew a friends '28 at Jenks Airport here in Okla. Same thrill, like riding a bike! Had runaway prop early in training, got rattled on final when unable to reduce airspeed ... unknown instructor radiod "drop your flaps, son" to help me out.


Byron Alperstein, e-mail, 13.09.2010 04:31

I owned a T28B for 7 years...just loved it.. except for the fragility of the engine.. had 3 rebuilds, even after operating the engine exactly like the operation manual required.. the plane always drew a crowd, made incredible amount of noise upon start up which thrilled all the on lookers..for acrobatics it was a jewel. it would climb like and eagle, spin was quite the experience,loops, rolls are real treat.. I am very grateful to have owned one of these wonderful aircraft... Byron


Chuck Jackwood, e-mail, 01.09.2010 01:05

Flew the 28 at Greenville MS Class 55K. Remember calling the prop 'the meat axe' because of its size. The only aircraft I flew at 0 airspeed. To join the 0 airspeed club you had to do a full loop at flank speed pullin about 4 Gs at the bottom then cut the loop short and go verticle at full throttle, then cut the power just as the 28 was wheezing out. The result = 0 airspeed for an instant till you started falling backward and kicking in full left or right rudder. Then once that big nose was heading down pour the coals to her avoid the spin and there you have it. Great aircraft to fly but unappreciated by many of us anxious to get in the T-33.


Bud Parker, 31.08.2010 20:01

C13tfs@aol.com
Before T33 training at Bryan. AFB TX in 1953, I flew the T28A.
Later, I went to the T28 Instructor pilot school at Craig AFB AL


where I learned to do inverted spins, a maneuver that I
used (while I was an IP at Vance AFB OK ) to scare hell out of any
multi-engine pilot who would fly with me. A superb acro bird with those
great big ailerons and a pretty reliable engine, it was fun to fly
and instruct in


Bud Parker, 31.08.2010 20:01

C13tfs@aol.com
Before T33 training at Bryan. AFB TX in 1953, I flew the T28A.
Later, I went to the T28 Instructor pilot school at Craig AFB AL


where I learned to do inverted spins, a maneuver that I
used (while I was an IP at Vance AFB OK ) to scare hell out of any
multi-engine pilot who would fly with me. A superb acro bird with those
great big ailerons and a pretty reliable engine, it was fun to fly
and instruct in


Vern Spohn, e-mail, 04.08.2010 02:44

I flew the T-28 A and B models at Keesler AFB, MS from 1971-72 training Vietnamese students. My T-28 time was some of the best flying I had in my 20 year Air Force Career. I still get a thrill from watching the "Mighty Trojans" at airshows across the country.


Oz Brockman, e-mail, 30.06.2010 03:15

After receiving my wings in '68, I was plowed back to NAS Whiting for a year as an instructor. Got over 1,000 hrs that year. I can't thank the Navy enough for the experience. What fun. I'm a "Trojan Driver" forever!


Clint Poss, e-mail, 21.05.2010 10:16

.... a problem with slow rudder application after that.

Great responsive plane.


Clint Poss, e-mail, 21.05.2010 10:08

Another nickname I recall was "the Beast". Possibly because compared to the T-34 it was quite a handfull. With only a few hours as a student pilot I was practicing approach turn stalls and recovery. At altitude the a/c was put into a 30 degree bank, power reduced and the nose raised until a stall began. Recovery was leveling the wings and applying power. With the T-34 full power was easily controlled even without using the rudder. Not so the T-28. When I slammed on the power I was slow with the rudder and it torque rolled. I found myself looking "up" at the green woods of NW Florida. I immediately reduced power, slammed the stick over, shoved my boot thru the firewall and the throttle thru the instrument panel. The IP came over the ICS and said he could have prevented it but thought it would make more of an impression this way. No S..t!! Never had


Tom Oliver, e-mail, 17.05.2010 22:10

I flew T-28A and D with USAFA MAP training program at Keesler AFB with Vietnamese students in 1970-1972. I was able to fly AT-28s with the Lao Hmong AT-28 student pilots during 1973.
Tom Oliver, CA, Cell: 925-381-0805


Mike Louy, e-mail, 27.04.2010 16:25

This is a great site! Although I have many stories about the T-28 after 1800 accident-free hours of instructing in it at NAS Whiting Field in VT-2 - transition, precision and acrobatics (1968 - 1971), here is one you might be interested in.

Flight surgeons going through training in Pensacola would routinely get some flight time. VT-1 at NAS Saufley Field would normally provide the training, but due to a high flight student load, they punted to us at Whiting. VT-2 got the job. Rem,ember, all Navy students flew the T-34B before moving up to the T-28. Not these flight surgeons. they had a slightly modified training program, but if they were physically qualified to solo and passed their safe for solo check flight, they got to fly a T-28 by themselves. Very few had previous civilian flight time.

I took one flight surgeon out on a check ride one Friday afternoon. He seemed to have problems taxiing, but through the course of the flight he was reasonably good in all maneuvers, stalls, spin, landings and course rules, so when we got back I gave him an UP. In the debrief I remarked that he seemed to have a little trouble taxiing. He then told me he was from NYC, didn't have a car, and HAD NEVER DRIVEN ONE!!! Can you imagine soloing a T-28 without ever having driven a car? I gave him "my" T-28B (2G-251, BUNO 138289) for his solo. Told him not to break it, and after he got back, report to me at the O'Club. Unfortunately, I can't recall his name.


Bob Griffiths, e-mail, 19.04.2010 13:39

How early would you like to go? I was A Royal Navy trainee pilot at Pensacola class of '53 when they were phasing out the SNJ. My Instructor was Lt. Cdr. Walker who was designated Senior Pilot for the 'new' T28 so I got lucky first time when the first one arrived. Being on SNJ's I didn't get to go through the course on the T28 but flying SNJs with nil maintenance was just as much fun and I had 3 fail on me in one week. (Rude comments abounded)


NH Rackley, e-mail, 29.03.2010 20:07

4 years as instructor at VT-3 Whiting, 3 years 9 months of which as Standardization [ax-man] Officer; 2,000 hours in both B and C. Strongest airplane not built by the Grumman Iron Works; not a paper airplane like the replacement Beechcraft T-34C. I wasn't a screamer or a Santa Claus...


Clifford, e-mail, 24.03.2010 11:39

Have 150 hours in the T-28B at Whiting in 1957. Loved the aircraft and feeling the G's when full power came on and the thrill of aerobatics. Got caught in the extend your commitment or get dropped from the program. Didn't take the bait. Only regrets are not soloing in formation and landing on the carrier. Got my own Cessna 182 Skylane in the 90's and eliminated some of the disappointment. Still remember the great guys I was with in the program. Of the five, two died later in accidents and one died scuba diving.


Earl B. "Red" Wynn, e-mail, 20.03.2010 10:31

Flew the B and C models in Navy Training Command at Whiting Field in 58 as a student and at NAS Memphis and Whiting from 59-62 as an instructor. It was a big jump from the T-34 but was extremely reliable and fun to fly. There was no ship available for T-28 Carquals as a student, so I got my first carrier landings in the F-9 Cougar. After getting my wings, my first duty was as a T-28/T2V instrument instructor at NAS Memphis. Before reporting there for duty, I was allowed to get carqualed in the T-28 as part of my "charm school" training. Would love to have one now(if avgas and maintenance were free).


Marsh Gullett, e-mail, 07.03.2010 00:16

My first and only job,[ 39 (+)years] after leaving the USNAVY in 1952, was with NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION,and It's subsequent owners ( Rockwell Internat. corp./ Boeing )
The first aircraft I worked on was the T28 trainer, In Downey, Calif. I fabricated the 'baggage door',and the 'bomb release box'.Seems like I fab'ed a '1000 doors & boxes', and when the 'Navy version'came in ,I fab'ed the 'New door' that incorporated the 'air-brake'.It's been more than 58 years and I believe I could fab a 'T28 baggage door,in my sleep today. When I was at Whiting Field,Fld. to see my
grandson's graduation as a Marine Helicopter pilot,the first thing I noticed was a 'T28' mounted on a pole near the parking lot and entrance. It returned fond memories of the 'Old Bird'..........mg


Bud Ashcraft, e-mail, 05.03.2010 04:55

I was a standardization formation instructor in the T-28 at whiting field, Fla. (mid 1960's) with two thousand (2000)hrs in type. The most fun flying I've ever had including 33 years with the airlines. A great airplane.


Roger Gavan, e-mail, 25.02.2010 07:59

I flew about 100 hours in this aircraft at Spense Air Base, Moultrie, Georgia.
I remember that after flying the T-34, the T-28 seemed huge and high. But after a few hours it was not difficult to fly and was very responsive and comfortable. We used the pitch out landing method in preparation for the T-33.


Arthur B Klein, e-mail, 12.02.2010 23:52

I was in the first AF training class to use the T-28.It was AF flying training class 50-G We were at Enid AFB in Oklahoma.It was in August 1950. It was a Multi-engine class..Basic was 8 months in the T-6 at a basic school then on to Enid and the T-28 then the B-25 with graduation in Dec 1950.There were numerous problems with the airplane early on which caused its grounding for a while.The improved A model and later models proved the airplanes great basic flying characteristics.After my time in the airplane,I regreted not going to single engine school instead of multi-engine school.I rember that I was the first pilot to land the airplane at Perrin AFB Texas at Sherman Tex on my solo Navigation mission fron Enid.


Ty Vu, e-mail, 14.01.2010 08:42

My uncle flew the T-28D in combat in Laos in the late 60s. He was one of the Hmong T-28 pilots that flew and fought under the command of general Vang Pao in Laos. He was shot down in 1969 on a combat mission. One of the best and bravest pilots during the Vietnam era was a T-28 Hmong pilot, named, Lee Lue. He was believed to have flown thousands of combat missions on a T-28. He too was shot down. His motto was fly and fight until you die. He was truely a great pilot for the Hmong people.

Ty Vu
1-13-10
Fresno,CA


John McGrail, e-mail, 07.01.2010 21:01

In 1978 the Navy was using the T28B and C, (yes, the carrier version was the C not the G) as the primary and intermediate trainer; it was the very first airplane a lot of student naval aviators ever touched. And even though I had a private when I started flight school it was INTIMIDATING! But I soon grew to love it. I see a lot of them flying now out here in Southern California; actually saw the bird I soloed in at Pensacola (Whiting Field) out at Camarillo, and would love to own one. It would be enough to get me back to flying which I haven't done since leaving the airlines quite a while back. What a great machine it was and is. Great memories of the most exciting days; earning navy wings was one of the proudest highlights of my life, and still is.


John McGrail, e-mail, 07.01.2010 21:00

In 1978 the Navy was using the T28B and C, (yes, the carrier version was the C not the G) as the primary and intermediate trainer; it was the very first airplane a lot of student naval aviators ever touched. And even though I had a private when I started flight school it was INTIMIDATING! But I soon grew to love it. I see a lot of them flying now out here in Southern California; actually saw the bird I soloed in at Pensacola (Whiting Field) out at Camarillo, and would love to own one. It would be enough to get me back to flying which I haven't done since leaving the airlines quite a while back. What a great machine it was and is. Great memories of the most exciting days; earning navy wings was one of the proudest highlights of my life, and still is.


Don Schmenk, e-mail, 03.01.2010 16:47

I instructed in T-28A and B (yes, B models) in the USAF. I have over 2,000 hours in them and last flew one with the Trojan Phlyers in April of this year. A wonderful, memorable airplane.


Adrian, e-mail, 21.12.2009 04:19

I looked into buying a t28
the prices have dropped
anyone looking to help me to preserve a warbird
some thoughts
1 non profit org
2 free area or space to store this bird can cut costs
3 a partner ship to own a piece of history
4 anyone know a museum that would love to have this as a display


JohnD. Alcorn, e-mail, 15.12.2009 13:58

I flew the T-28A at Bainbridge, GA before going to the T-33 at Laredo. Daunting at first (after Too-34) but fun to fly after a little transition with a great instructor, Wilburn James.I still love to hear the unique sound of that radial engine at air shows.


Sam Herron, e-mail, 03.12.2009 00:23

I flew the T-28A for 50 hours at Williams AFB, Class 54-0, then on to the T-33.


mico, e-mail, 26.08.2009 18:37

There is presently a T28 na trainer located at skaneatlas, N.Y. Airport,315-685-7737. I first saw it out there, after my army service. I worked at the airport for about a year and saw this magnificent aircraft everyday. I stored parts for this aircraft in a barn, located on airport property. At the time, the airport was owned by Don Anklin. I know that Don Anklin Sr. was killed in an aircraft accident a few years after my employment there. I presently do not know who owns the airport, or who has posession of this aircraft. Ifyou fly, I would suggest you look further into this, because if you get a chance to see one fly,you will never forget that expirience.


Adrian, e-mail, 10.06.2009 12:33

I am looking to get a ride in one. I am on the East Coast. Does anyone have any contacts? I was thinking to experiencing the flight and maybe getting one as a project to preserve a great plane in history (non profit mission)
Adrian 860-518-7999


Kurt, e-mail, 16.03.2009 04:21

We had several of the T28s at Ft. Bragg, NC in the 70's. We first had the A models with a smaller engine and then the B models with the bigger one. Believe it or not, we had them to fly photo chase missions over the Ft. Bragg drop zones when special equipment was dropped during testing. Our people then flew circles around the drop while the photographer in the rear seat, moved his canopy out of the way and shot high-speed motion pictures (slow motion) so the various parts of the drop parachutes and gear could be observed during operation. One of those drops streamerd in a Sheridan light weight air droppable tank, fully combat loaded. Messy...


Kurt, e-mail, 16.03.2009 04:21

We had several of the T28s at Ft. Bragg, NC in the 70's. We first had the A models with a smaller engine and then the B models with the bigger one. Believe it or not, we had them to fly photo chase missions over the Ft. Bragg drop zones when special equipment was dropped during testing. Our people then flew circles around the drop while the photographer in the rear seat, moved his canopy out of the way and shot high-speed motion pictures (slow motion) so the various parts of the drop parachutes and gear could be observed during operation. One of those drops streamerd in a Sheridan light weight air droppable tank, fully combat loaded. Messy...


William Steely, e-mail, 09.09.2008 06:28

I only got 90 hours in the T-28 (air force primary at Graham Air Base, Florida), but still have good memories; had a great instructor which helped. Then I went to jets T-33's,and instructed them at Laredo AFB. The T-28 had a tendency to sputter (as I remember) on over the top manuevers, scary to a new pilot. What a great site this is.


Silver, e-mail, 14.07.2008 11:03

Big transition from the T-34 in Saufley to the T-28. Got all of my advanced basic including gunnery, tactics, instruments and carrier landings in this bird. Flying with the cockpit open getting ready for the carrier at some of those old WW-II fields west of Pensacola was a great memory. Got three touch and gos and five traps in one flight and came back to Saufley on the same tank of gas. Gunnery was fun and so was bombing. Big cockpit with a big powerful engine that had me landing one night after a couple of touch and gos because the flames from the exhaust came fling past the windscreen when I added full power to get in the air again. Not use to that since most of flying was in jets at the time. Made my last landing flying the T-28 in the Salton Sea. Just ran out of airspeed, altitude and brains at the same time. Never thought I'd fly the T-28 in my first and last years of my Naval career[21]. Loved this plane. Never had a problem with one. Not even a rough running engine. Just picked a poor time to get a wash job. Most room I ever saw in an airplane cockpit. The Navy added extra instruments on the panel to get pilots ready for the jets and it still had lots of room for more. Great flying plane. One you felt like you put on your back when you put on your chute before start up. Nice sounds too.


Ken Langford, e-mail, 15.05.2008 03:32

I flew the T-28B and C off and on for seven years. They were really good airplanes, very reliabe and fun to fly in all kinds of weather.


thawkins, e-mail, 23.09.2007 02:23

The aircraft carrier capable T-28 was the T-28C not "G". In addition to the arresting hook, the propeller was slightly smaller and there were some modifications to the landing gear.


Joseph H. Peek, e-mail, 30.04.2007 08:32

I flew 250 hours of training in this aircraft as an intermediary vehicle to multi-engine fleet aircraft. It was a very powerful bird to fly with retractable gear and basic radio-navigational capabilities. Most enjoyable to fly and to become proficient as an aviator. Navy flight training was supurb. Call me 404-325-4866 cell in GA.


Joseph H. Peek, e-mail, 30.04.2007 08:32

I flew 250 hours of training in this aircraft as an intermediary vehicle to multi-engine fleet aircraft. It was a very powerful bird to fly with retractable gear and basic radio-navigational capabilities. Most enjoyable to fly and to become proficient as an aviator. Navy flight training was supurb. Call me 404-325-4866 cell in GA.




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