North American F-100 "Super Sabre"
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Stan schroeder, e-mail, 01.11.2017 04:55

I was a jet engine mechanic and worked on the Pratt Whitney J57-21 engine in the F-100 for most of my 8 year time in the AF. I was stationed at Cannon AFB, Bein Hoa Vietnam and my last 4 years at Tinker AFB which was overhaul base for the J57, among other engines. The J57 engine was a fairly easy engine to work and I loved it. I always thought the F100 was a beautiful aircraft. It looked fast just setting on the Tarmac


Thonas, e-mail, 30.09.2017 21:20

Jet mech. crew chief from 1963 through1967 cannon afbn.m. tdy 's Ben how viet nam Misawa japan,Kunsan korea.then permen transfer to Hahn Germany worked flight line pE and post dock. Mostly on f100 D's&F's mid 67 they replaced them at Hahn with the f4,never cared much for that aircraft I preferred the old super sabre.


Chick Contini, e-mail, 26.07.2017 20:23

Like Jerry Zerm, I was stationed at Misawa Japan fom 9/63 to 9/65 and went TDY to Ubon Thailand as a teletype maintenance man. We were bombing the North but saying we were not there. The Aussie were across the runway and had the only pool on the base so I spent time there being the only one assigned and on duty 24/7. Also watched a lot of English movies and spent a load of time in the ACed library. Can't remember the fighter sq. on TDY there. Would love to know who was there in the summer of 1965. Thanks


Bill Tasi, e-mail, 11.12.2016 20:04

Crewed 55-2945 at Tuy Hoa AB Vietnam from July 1969- July 1970. Lt Carroll Johnson was the Pilot. Great plane. Great group of Techs and Pilots. Working for Continental Airlines and now United Airlines in Cleveland . If you were at Tuy Hoa 308 TFS send me an email.


Robert Prescott, e-mail, 07.05.2016 00:50

I was at George AFB 31st fighter wing from 1960 to 1962 our wing was transferred to Homestead AFB in 1962. I was a jet engine mechanic. We were deployed to different bases around the world to support the change over from F-100 to the new F-105's I was sent Kadena AFB Okinawa in 1962. Ralph Graden said really like any communication from anyone there at that time. I remember the "Snake Pit" for beer after work almost every night and the typhoons we went through back then.


Ross Stewart, e-mail, 21.06.2015 23:54

I am the curator of the RAF Wethersfield Museum, hoping some of the 20th TFW will contact me at Wethersfield.museum@outlook.com and check out the RAF Wethersfield Facebook Page and connect with other 20th colleagues and join in with F100 stories and photos.


purpl3 k, e-mail, 11.04.2015 18:59

I was in the Ohio ANG in 62-69.
The Unit had F100C
As an A3C I became a Technician for the 121 TFG. I was trained as a parachute rigger, but picked up additional duties as a Personal Equipment Tech and Fabric, Leather and Rubber Products Repairman.
As a rigger I was responsible for maintaining the drag chute bin which held about 50 drag chutes. In my years there I repacked many thousands
We went TDY to a lot stateside locations, closest was Alpena, where we would build the "darts" used in air to air live fire. We would dip the ammos tips in different colored paint as to readily identify the hits. Went from Alpena, where it was snowing in Oct, to Homestead Fl. Got out of the C47 wearing our parkas and had them laughing
I missed the units tour in Kunsan Korea because of a blood pressure issue but extended my enlistment through the activation-deactivation for the Pueblo Crisis in 69.

I have great memories of my ride in the "F" and the T-33


larry magnano, e-mail, 17.03.2015 18:34

stationed in england with the 79 tfs at woodbridge july 1968 to july 1970 phase inspection good plane easy to work on


Don Koerner, e-mail, 07.03.2015 16:41

Ah,the F-100, I got to crew FW 424 as asst c/c and later FW 373 as chief at Myrtle Beach AFB back in the 60s (60-63) seemed we were always TDY at places like Avaino, Nellas, Hahn, Elemendorf, McCoy, Libia etc. got to see a lot of surrounding countries at the TDY locations. Also got lucky at Nellas to go on a sidewinder mission , It was probally in FW 377 obviously a "F" model I think we had FW 692 as a "F" also. I still have a lot of movie footage taken at Nellas and Myrtle Beach. Did get to see one come in at Myrtle Beach with right main gear in up position, scary for a few moments, pilot walked away, which made it a good landing. Don Koerner kk4vk@verizon.net


Joseph Drake, e-mail, 02.02.2015 00:30

I was the crew chief of F100-56-3319. I was suprised when I saw the Number on the F-100 on the pedistal at one of the gates at Lakenheath. 56-3319 crashed in the lybian desert in '69. I was there. I wonder if they put my name on it as the crew chief. Other wise its not authinic, plus the IFR probe is missing too.


Oliver Donaldson, 31.08.2014 06:18

Looking for Dick Cottle class 56H contact me at ofdon@comcast.net


FD Hanson, e-mail, 02.02.2014 00:53

Found a newspaper clipping that my dad had saved. "Newest At North American" From "The Columbus Citizen" newspaper.
The first F-100D Super Sabre off the lines of the North American Aviation plant here is shown in its maiden flight.
Test pilot Fred Hanson was at the controls of the plane that flies itself electronically to a target at supersonic speeds. (The tail # on the photo is 52720)


JEFFREY W CROWELL, e-mail, 22.01.2014 19:47

Spent two tours at Wethersfield, 1956-59 and 1962-66. Was a maintenance mechanic in the hangar when the first F-100 came in in 1957, and when I returned in 1962 was a crew chief on F-100F 56-3898 and F-100D 55-3692. Loved this aircraft and it still has a spot in my heart.


Bob Kusterer, e-mail, 02.12.2013 21:21

Hey Hoover, I flew your bird. I was in the MA ANG when you delivered it. You probably know Pete Kehoe. He was my IP. We converted to the F-106 but none of our Huns went to the bone yard; I ferried many to different ANG squadrons. Glad I had the opportunity to fly the Hun.


Howard wicklund, e-mail, 31.10.2013 03:54

e mail correction on last post. should be howies2@hotmail.com


Howard Wicklund, e-mail, 30.10.2013 23:25

Ralph Garden, I was also stationed on at Kadina Okinawa from about 1960 to 1961 18 months,I was in the PM hanger for 100 hour inspection on the F-100 D and F models. I remember the "Snake Pit" for beer after work almost every night. and the typhoons we went through back then.


E. Schulte, e-mail, 22.10.2013 23:42

I crewed an F-100d,Lakenheath from 69-72. I was in the 493rd. I liked the
Aircraft,it was easy to work on.would like to hear from anyone from there at that time.


Carter Endsley, e-mail, 26.09.2013 21:08

I was a jet engine mechanic, assigned to the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing at Chaumont AFB, France and later moved to R.A.F. Lakenheath ,England. This was from 1958 to 1961. We had F-100D aircraft, colorfully painted with candy stripe nose, tail and wing tips. The 492nd squadron was blue, the 493rd was yellow and the 494th was red. We had nuclear bombs and that is why France (Charles DeGaulle) wanted us out of France, so we moved to England.


Mike (Tug) Hogan a1/c, e-mail, 15.09.2013 03:50

I was a crew chief on F100's Spang. Ger. 1959 to 1961. I was with 8th TFS Then to 49th CAM We did call it the Lead Sled & the Silver Dollar loved to work on them. I crewed "652" also was TDY to Wheelus Lybia several times. Lots of good memories


Cliff, e-mail, 01.09.2013 01:31

Bit of trivia... The F100 was the last production fighter in U.S. inventory to cost less than one million dollars per copy.


Barney Barnhart, e-mail, 29.08.2013 23:53

I was on Kedena 1960 for 18 month and was in the 67th tac fighter sq.and I really liked the f-100-d and had a lot of unusal experiances there and wouldn trade them for anything.


Larry May, e-mail, 29.08.2013 21:00

Worked on J33's for the T33, then on the J57 at Luke in 1966. Then at Tuy HOA RVN from Oct 67 thru Oct 68. Didn't put in for it but I came back to the states working on J57 and TF33 engines for the B52 and KC135


Hoover, e-mail, 14.04.2013 21:17

Flew the F-100 at CannonAFB, NM, RAF Wethersfield, UK, RAF Upper Heyford, UK, & Phang Rang AB, Viet Nam. Great bird, durable with wonderful range . Like a Timex - takes a lick in' and keeps on tickin'! Closed out a squadron everywhere I was stationed. Ferried my Hun from Viet Nam in '71 to the Mass ANG. Saw it the following year at Tinker AFB encounters to the Boneyard. Brought a tear to the eye.


Phil, e-mail, 09.02.2013 23:08

I remember #753, the Susan Constant, while she was flying with the NM ANG. One can still see her flying towards the end of the movie "Skyjacked". She's impersonating a Russian Mig-21. They got the red stars painted on, but the forward fuselage numbers and the roadrunner on her vertical stab are still very much visible. I made display model of her for the Albuquerque Sunport many year ago.


Ralph Graden, e-mail, 24.01.2013 22:37

Stationed 1959-61 at Kadena AFB Okinawa with the 18th FMS. Our commander was Francis S. Gabreski, an ace from way back. Worked on hydraulic systems on F-100 & RF-101's. Have a USAF Outstanding Unit Award framed & on my wall. I would really like any communication from anyone there at that time.


Lance, e-mail, 12.01.2013 19:11

Wayne, Check your dash 1. F-100 c, 183 plus fuel on final


CHARLES BROWN, e-mail, 24.11.2012 19:40

I WAS STATIONED AT ITAZUKE AFB IN JAPAN FROM 58-60 AND WAS IN ENGINE BUILD UP,TEST CELL AND INSTALED ENGINE INTO F-100 AIRCRAFT. THEN RUN THEM TO CHECK FOR LEAKS.THIS WAS A FINE AIRCRAFT. FOR THE TWO YEARS WE WERE THERE WE DIDN'T LOSE A ONE.


Ray A. Gandy, e-mail, 24.11.2012 01:07

Joe Flemming, I should know you I was Jet eng. mech. A/2C [Goose] Ray Gandy at England AFB 8-May-58 thru 18-Oct. 61 Was temp assigned to 614th Sept 59 as asst crew chief on #834 [Col. Carr's bird] then back to 401st CAMS engine shop, was TDY to Eglin Field with 614th Oct.60, Also On the "Berlin Crisis Sep 61 on TS assignment with Col. Carr, then due to a SNAFU was sent back to EAFB for Discharge after 18 days


Teddy LaPlante, e-mail, 08.08.2012 07:45

It's nice to see that the Hun is still alive, if only in our hearts. I was a crew chief on the F100 in Lybia 1968-69. The 7272 FTW ( Fighter Training Wing) I belive was the only one of it's kind in the Air Force inventory. We had only 16 Huns to train all the squadrons from Europe they would prctice arial combat and bombing in the desert. I guess before they went to Nam. I was proud to be a crew chief on the F100 and especcialy when I stenciled my name on the nose gear door. I was a staff sgt. and 20 years old


Michael Wieczynski, e-mail, 29.07.2012 19:43

F-100
While in the USAF I worked on F-100’s from 1967 to 1969 in armament. At Myrtle Beach with the 355th TFS (Fighting Falcons) we were mobilized to Phu Cat VN in 1968. During the six months we were their TDY we loaded over 14,000 sorties. Then a short time with the 121st ANG back at the beach. After that I went to Bien Hoa VN. in 1969 with the 510th TFS (Buzzards of Bien Hoa). During all that time we lost two planes, one in flight making a bombing run in the Valley, and the other took a rocket setting on the ground. The plane was a real work horse coming back from missions with tree branches stuck in the wing and one time on the way beck from Phase in Iraq a wing was not put together and separated, the leading edge slats fell out in flight, no problem! All things considered it was a easy plane to load although the ammo cans would get rounded out on the bottom which made it hard to slide them into the ammo bay, sometimes we would have to get the ammo stand rocking and kick’em in. Definitely a Great Plane. Send me an email if you were there.


John, e-mail, 14.07.2012 06:07

Was a F100 Crew Chief at Cannon AFB fron 61 thru 64. Started in the 522TFS and later they moved everyone to the 27TH OMS. While in the 522nd I crewed A/C 902 F model which was the commanders A/C.Went TDY all around the world with the 100's.My last TDY was to DA NANG in 64. I came home in DECEMBER and left the planes there.


Michael Dunphy, e-mail, 21.06.2012 06:47

I am looking for information regarding the death of 1LT Richard Tachibana who flew the F-100D in the 417th TFS. He was killed in a crash (type unknown) while flying from Ramstein AB on 13 July 1961. Please contact me if you can provide any details.


robert lee clay, e-mail, 17.06.2012 21:36

worked on the f100f at spang from the 50s to 1961. 49th fighter bomber wing. we called it the lead sled. loved working on it though. also looking for sgt gorden tanner if anyone knows him.I went to wheelus as well. bob clay


Michael Wieczynski, e-mail, 12.06.2012 19:43

While in the USAF I worked on F-100’s from 1967 to 1969 in armament. At Myrtle Beach with the 355th TFS (Fighting Falcons) we were mobilized to Phu Cat VN in 1968. During the six months we were their TDY we loaded over 14,000 sorties. Then a short time with the 121st ANG back at the beach. After that I went to Bien Hoa VN. in 1969 with the 510th TFS (Buzzards of Bien Hoa). During all that time we lost two planes, one in flight making a bombing run in the Valley, and the other took a rocket setting on the ground. The plane was a real work horse coming back from missions with tree branches stuck in the wing and one time on the way beck from Phase in Iraq a wing was not put together and separated, the leading edge slats fell out in flight, no problem! All things considered it was a easy plane to load although the ammo cans would get rounded out on the bottom which made it hard to slide them into the ammo bay, sometimes we would have to get the ammo stand rocking and kick’em in. Definitely a Great Plane. Send me an email if you were there.


Jim Frederick, e-mail, 11.06.2012 02:18

Flew F-100D & F '76 - '78. Ohio ANG. In the early '70's Ohio had four F-100 squadrons. Reliable, hardly ever a problem. Maintenance guys (mostly guys back then) kept them in top shape. We retired them in '78 to Davis Monthan.


Jerry Zerm, e-mail, 07.06.2012 17:53

worked in Misawa Japan from 8/63 to 8/65 in the 21stFMS squadron. The 100 sqds there were the 531st and 416th, that returned to the States in 64, and were replaced on a rotational basis by units from Cannon AFB. The engine shop at Misawa supported the F-100s, F-102, and the RF-101-C.


Marina Roell, e-mail, 03.06.2012 09:39

I have some home movies my dad took in 1960 and 1961 in Bermuda, of in-flight refueling of a B-66 and an F-100 (I think the tail # is 63435?) He was in the refueling aircraft, and you can watch the pilot in the jet as they fly together. Amazing flying. I'm happy to share if anyone is interested.


William Glenn, e-mail, 02.06.2012 18:20

I first worked on the F-100 as a jet mechanic at Clark in 62-64. I worked on some of the same birds at Bien Hoa in 66-67. My next tour with the F-100's was in Torrejon 69-73. We went over to F4E after a couple years, and gave our F-100's to Turkey. They were a pain to work on the installed engines,(flightline work) but I loved the old lead sled.


Chris Donaldson A1/c, e-mail, 02.06.2012 17:12

While at Myrtle Beach AFB in 1961-62 I worked in the Wing Command Post of the 354th Fighter Wing. I worked with a Capt. Rainwater who told me that while he was operational, he was landing his F-100 he had a brain fart and landed on his drop tanks, having forgot to deploy the landing gear.He walked away and there was minamal damage to the plane. I guess God was his co-pilot that day.


Martin O'Donnell, e-mail, 31.05.2012 05:55

I was at Da Nang AB, Viet Nam in "71-72". I saw an F-100 come screaming down the runway riding on a "Ball of Sparks" and veer off the cement into the center section one day. The pilot was half way out of that "Bullet" before it came to a complete stop. Believe it or not, they put that bird into a hanger up on the other side of the field by the Kaman helicopters and I think they rebuilt it. I might be wrong, but I think that bird actually flew again. Shortly after that I found myself on top of an APC babysitting a 50 cal. all night, so I kind of had a couple of other things on my mind. I guess I don't need to tell "Ya All" what those "Two Things" were.


Clint Lynch MSgt ret., e-mail, 11.04.2012 05:37

I started on the F100 J57 Engine right out of tech school in 1960 I had just turned 18. went to japan then thailand with F105's. See the F100 again in 1968 in Bein Hoa. Left there after 1 year then to Cannon with the 524th TFS. The last F100 Sq in the AF


David Kramer, e-mail, 31.03.2012 05:20

My Father flew the F-100 for 15 years and our family grew up of and around her. You may have guessed that this is a commemoration to this great "HUN" in the passing of our Father, Colonel F.J. "Pat" Kramer Jr. He first flew the Hun in UPT at Luke in 1957 and was assigned to Hahn AB with the 461st FDS flying the C-Hun. Then 1 year later was selected to the USAFE Skyblazers flying Solo, Slot, and then Leader in the 1961 show season. In January 1962 the Skyblazers were disbanded and the crews were sent back to the States; we went to Luke. Dad then went to Ben Hoi in the Hun, and later to Phu Cat "Bird-dogging" in the O-1E. The Hun later re-entered my Father's life at England AFB with the 68th, 531st, and 416th TFTS return from SEA. These were the days most impressionable to me as I grew up in Life Support performing Helmet BPO's and writing the FRAG in grease pencil on the OPS flying boards. The smell of JP4 from the operating J57 stuck with me like the smell of fresh strawberry jam on toast with a soft shell crab stuffed in between. More so I love the history of the F-100 after crewing F-4E's and F-16's since 1976. I am still working on the 16 here at Luke, just yards away where my parents brought me into this world. I am still passionate with the MOST BEAUTIFUL HUN in the world building plastic models of the F-100 in DETAIL, historically collecting, and documenting its journey. The Hun to our family was the last, if not the loss of innocence as she "...danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings..." as the last of the all metal fighters; Oh what strories we have heard and tell… I LOVE YOU DADDY!!


David Kramer, e-mail, 31.03.2012 05:17

My Father flew the F-100 for 15 years and our family grew up of and around her. You may have guessed that this is a commemoration to this great "HUN" in the passing of our Father, Colonel F.J. "Pat" Kramer Jr. He first flew the Hun in UPT at Luke in 1957 and was assigned to Hahn AB with the 461st FDS flying the C-Hun. Then 1 year later was selected to the USAFE Skyblazers flying Solo, Slot, and then Leader in the 1961 show season. In January 1962 the Skyblazers were disbanded and the crews were sent back to the States; we went to Luke. Dad then went to Ben Hoi in the Hun, and later to Phu Cat "Bird-dogging" in the O-1E. The Hun later re-entered my Father's life at England AFB with the 68th, 531st, and 416th TFTS return from SEA. These were the days most impressionable to me as I grew up in Life Support performing Helmet BPO's and writing the FRAG in grease pencil on the OPS flying boards. The smell of JP4 from the operating J57 stuck with me like the smell of fresh strawberry jam on toast with a soft shell crab stuffed in between. More so I love the history of the F-100 after crewing F-4E's and F-16's since 1976. I am still working on the 16 here at Luke, just yards away where my parents brought me into this world. I am still passionate with the MOST BEAUTIFUL HUN in the world building plastic models of the F-100 in DETAIL, historically collecting, and documenting its journey. The Hun to our family was the last, if not the loss of innocence as she "...danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings..." as the last of the all metal fighters; Oh what strories we have heard and tell… I LOVE YOU DADDY!!


jim mitchell, e-mail, 25.03.2012 20:11

Mymother and father(Master sgtlemuel mitchell were killed by theF100 atTurnerAFB on Dec 17h 1957,NEVER LEARNED OF THE CAUSE? I OBSERVED THE AIR- CRAFTTAKING OFFAND REACH ABOUT 800FT BEFORE BANKING TO THE LEFT AND COMING TOWARD US, I WAS 11 YRS OLD AN RANTOWARDTHE BASE HOSPITAL,ONLY ONE TO SURVIVE.


Bob Terbet, e-mail, 21.03.2012 21:56

I enjoyed flying the F-100 a great airplane. Very memorable time in my life. 1957-1966. 510th at Clark AB, 309th TFS at George & Homestead AFB. Wound up with 2,000 hours in the HUN. Honored to have been a part of that program.


Joe Fleming, e-mail, 13.03.2012 11:56

To: A2c Michael Jerosz, I remember you Mike!!! You should also leave a comment at England Afb site.


Joe Fleming, e-mail, 13.03.2012 11:40

I was assigned to the 614th tfs out of tech sch."All Men are devils, only the choosen few are lucky devils!!! I crewed f-100D 55-2884, as an a/3c after completeing ftd 43151 and 43171 trainig classes at England AFB. I can relate to pilot Moore's comments about the fuel probe. They were straight and I recall replacing quite a few broken off during in-flight training.Later the probe were changed to the goose neck type. At that time the aircraft tails were checker board and the nose was red.
I can still visualize installing the drag chute. Laying on my back with strong legs to close the door.I can see myself on the front end arms crossed to lift those 450 gal. drop tanks. 3 men two on the front and 1 to 2 on the rear to hang. The key was to only put a small amout of fuel from the truck. Start the engine (throttle around the horn after 33%.advance the throttle to about 65% to get the ac on the line. No Leak----- fill up The tanks. Otherwise you had to de-fuel all that jp-4. Rotated to Aviano afb and the famed Incirlik afb (Adana Turkey). Later crewed F-100F 56-3834,and had flight time in that bird after a fire power demo in Florida. My demise I was selected to play for a mediocre base basketball team Our 614th squadron bet them. Little did I know that after joining that "sidewinder" team in 1962, we went all the way to the USAFE championship in England. My TDY to Turkey lasted 4 months (two months I was gone). !!! Gone from the 614th, transfered to the 615th. Would not change a thing. I still have a taste for 'cream beef on Toast and the smell on 5606 (kool aid)fluid.


Stan Cook, e-mail, 09.02.2012 03:17

Comment to Fred Fralin and B2Boy. I was stationed at Hahn AB in 1965-66-67 with 496th FIS. These aircraft were the F-102. I did not see the F-100 on the base at this time. I was what was called" Armament Load Crew' or " Armament Fire Control System Specialist". My first contact with the F=100{we clled it the Lead Sled} was 1968-69 at Bien Hoa AB in Nam with the 90th TFS. This a/c was good worker and carried a good payload munitions. The pilots always said that if the enignes went, the plane would- drop out of the air- no guide path0 hence the name Lead Sled. Any additional info, contact me at e-mail address.


Bob Jones, e-mail, 09.01.2012 06:41

‘66 thru ‘69
77th TFS, 20th TFW, RAF Station Wethersfield.

77-2 Weapons Load Team,
No 1, Crew Chief: Ralph Ortbals
No 2, Cockpit: Wayne Manning
No 3, Wingman; Alan (Dino) DelVecchio
No 4, MJ-1 (Jammer Driver) Bob Jones

The best damn weapons crew to ever load a ‘Super Sled’.

After a 1000 point (flawless) load, during a USAFE exercise in ‘68, the inspector told us…
“That was an excellent load… if I ever see you load a nuke in fifteen minutes again… I’ll bust all of you!”


Walter E. Daw, e-mail, 05.01.2012 20:39

I served 3 years at RAF Lakenheath as a Crew Chief on F100D. I was there for 3 years between 1963-66. The hardest part was changing main gear tires. I loved when they sent me and my acft TDY to Wheelus AFB Tripoli, North Africa. Had my first ride in a F100F while TDY at Wheelus--what a thrill.


Fred Fralin, e-mail, 14.12.2011 02:02

Crewed F100F 56-3805 at Hahn ab Germany 10th TFS 1964 till they left in 1966. Worked tool crib for the F4, went to England Nov 66 till April 67 working F100D's
Crewed F100F 56-3866 at Luke AFB AZ till it crashes on takeoff because of an over torqued AB pigtail spray bar fuel line, blew the aft section up, pilots got out, one had a broken leg. Worked C section midnights doing preflight run ups. Loved the F100, I did all maintence on the birds till they brought in the speclishs.


Jim Taylor, e-mail, 05.11.2011 22:31

I was a crew chief on f-100s from 63-67. Went tdy to Danang an Thailand. I was involved in the move from Cannon to Luke in September of 65.


R. Sansbury, e-mail, 21.10.2011 18:23

I was a crew chief on the C,D,& F at George AFB in 1956- 62. Changing a tire was a chore, and I agree, Hydraulic leaks every day! I went to Spain in 1958 with a B47 group and we were a TACH Squadren called REFLEX.


J. Yates, e-mail, 20.10.2011 22:49

I was assigned to the 354th TFW Myrtle Beach AFB from 1960-63. Worked as a jet mechanic on the J-57. Went on three NATO rotations; Germany (Berlin Wall), Italy and Turkey. Being stationed at the beach was tough, but somebody had to do it!


Bill, e-mail, 26.09.2011 18:33

I was in the 21 FMS at misawa japan 1958-1960. We went from F-84G to F-100D. The 21st TFW Which had the 531st TFS & 416th TFS. I worked engine shop and the test stand.


Dave Doeing, e-mail, 25.08.2011 06:14

Worked the engine shop at Luke in june of 1968.Was with the 31FMS engine shop Tuy Hoa from Oct 68 to Oct 69.Than went to England A.F.B. and worked the A-37.


Ken Terry, e-mail, 05.07.2011 06:32

I was stationed at Cannon A.F.B.Clovis,N.M.From 4/10/58 to
5/30/62 as Jet Engine Mech on F100Ds in the27TFW.I Work the Engine P.E. Docks,Engine in the Aircraft repairs and Engine installs and removeals.The last TWO years I ran the Trim Pad doing engine run ups and Afterburner test and trims.Our Engines were J57 P21 Pratt and Whitney. Which I worked at when got out of the U.S.A.F. Now my wife and I
spend time putting our Jet Engine Shop Reunions on we had
24 guys and thier wives at our 45TH Reunion we had some A/C mechs and Electical guys come.Email me if interested.


steve, e-mail, 31.05.2011 19:51

How did the F-100 maneuver against the F-8 Crusader, which used the same engine and was perhaps the closest match to the F-100's Russian equivalent, the MiG-19.


JJ Watson, e-mail, 14.05.2011 17:20

Crewed 55-3765 @ Tuy Hoa AB, RVN 66-67 (308th TFS)
Crewed 55-3668 @ Wethersfield, England 68-69 (77th TFS)
Crewed 55-3666 @ Lakenhealth, England 71-72 (493th TFS)


art roberts, Capt., e-mail, 10.05.2011 19:15

I was a pilot in the 494th TFS at FAF Lakenheath, 1963-1966. Loved the Hun, although she was a bear to land or dogfight. tended to flip in high G turns. We had a great bunch of guys in the 48 TFW, and thank God for the maintenaince and ground crews who kept us flying !


B2Boy, e-mail, 05.05.2011 18:31

Worked on the J57's at Hahn, and Torrejon in the 401st, still have the patch that was on my fatigues. I worked in the Jet Shop for TSgt Hendricks. I also got a taste of the AB shop;yuck.


Louis A. Boykin, e-mail, 26.04.2011 04:11

I was the crew chief on F100F 3907 494th Fighter Sq. 48th TFW at Lakenhealth England . Time in country 65-67. I love working on that ACFT, Had a chance to run in the back seat down in Lydia, Loved it. If anyone that was station at Lakenhealth doing that time please get back with me.Lt Col Horton was the 494th TFS CO.


Joe Kremers, e-mail, 03.04.2011 08:11

I was a weapons officer in the 401st TFW 1964-7. Home base was England AFB, Alexandria, LA. Rotated to Dan Nang with the 613th TFS November '64. Lost three pilots, two KIA (including the squadron CO) and one POW at the Hilton for several years. Got a back seat ride in the F model on way to a firepower demo at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. What a ride. Lots of vibration on TO roll from that long skinny nose wheel. Good memories of the Hun !


Grady Talbot, e-mail, 24.02.2011 06:33

I flew the Hun at England AFB, Takhli, DaNang, Phan Rang in the 615th TFs, and Luke AFB, 1963-69 in the 4510th CCTW, including the 4517th CCTS and 4514th CCTS. It always got me back. So thanks to all you maintainers who put so much into keeping the bird healthy and flying. God bless you all.


cyrus sumner, e-mail, 23.02.2011 17:42

I need right and left elevators for a D i'm trying to get togather to display in charlotte,nc, Any piece small or beat up, burned any thing will help.I,ll make what I don'thave if I can get some piaces, thanks


a2c mike (wally) jarosz, 22.02.2011 02:04

I joined 401st TFW in june 1960, and was assigned to the 614th TFS and was assigned to bFLT, Msgt Pickney (capo)and SSgt J.K.bowles CC on acft 55-2874. in jan 61 I went to avaiano AB Italy and in 62 I deployed to Germany for the building of the Berlin wall. In 63 i remember when Pres Kennedy was murdered I was discharged in 64. I relinsted in 65 and was sent back to the 614th and deployed to vietnam at Phan Rang from 66 to 67


sgt T, e-mail, 22.02.2011 01:20

I see the note from Troy who worked in PE dock. I worked on dock 1 60 to 63


RAMJET, e-mail, 18.02.2011 01:08

I WAS A CREW CHIEF AT LAKENHEATH IN THE 493RD FROM MAY66 TO MAY69 HAD SOME GOOD TIMES BOLO BRUNSON WAS OUR CO I HEARD ONE OF OUR PIOLTS ENDED UP IN NAM IN THE HILTON I THINK HIS FIRST NAME WAS PAUL LET ME KNOW


Tom Cerny, e-mail, 05.02.2011 21:23

I was stationed at Kadena Air Base Okinawa with the 12TFS 1960-62. As an airman 2nd. class I was to become crew chief of my beloved F100-D 63-287, Replacing S/Sgt Bracken when he rotated back to the states. During my time with 287 I was fortunate enough to become 18th TFW crew chief of the month, June 1961. Beating out all the 44Th TFS, 67TH TFS, A squadron of F101s, a T33 squadron,and numerous C47 and C54s on base. I can't recall all that happened there, but like everyone else I do remember most of the good stuff. Any one else out ther from the 12, 44, or 67th outfits?


robert kline, e-mail, 30.01.2011 06:00

I served 2 years @ RAF Lakenheath as a 32250B Fire Control Tech and did TDYs to Libya and Turkey. The English were so hospitable. I had the great privilege of a F100F flight. Love that aircraft and the USAF !!!


Floyd, e-mail, 08.01.2011 21:31

I spent over 9 months working on the D and F models as an airframe repairman. This was at Phu Cat AB, RVN from the time the first aircraft arrived in March 67 until January 68. I was there when the Misty FAC mission was originated and when Colonel Bud Day was shot down.
The F-100 was a great bird and airframe wise good to work on. The 2 jobs that were a hassle were;
crawling down the intake to replace the panel around the gun purge door.
crawling into the hot exhaust cone to cut out the inner rings of the flame holder.
All in all I enjoyed my time that I was privileged to be associated with the F-100.


Richard Sinclair, e-mail, 18.12.2010 04:57

I crewed 56-3134 @ George AFB in the 34TFS with Flt. Lt. Mansell of the RAF as my pilot.Robie Risner was the Cmdr. & a finer man never walked. Later I was assigned to the 21 St which became the 307thTFS. I crewed F100F 56-3955 & Yeager had the 306th next door. We flew the pants off them . Flew about 809 hrs in F-4's & T-38's With Lt. Col Dave Ferguson who had the 1st flt. of the YF-22 for Lockheed, Lt. Cmdr Tom Morganfeld VX-4 NAS Pt Mugu who had 1st. flt of the YF-35 JSF for Lockheed & several other Edwards test pilots. Great times & even worked for Flt Sys. @ Mojave Ca. droning some of the Huns which were assigned to my flt. @ George when I made flt.chief. The Hun kept you busy & you had to work hard, but it was easy to learn even some of the avionics. Most crew chiefs had jumper wires & usually could clear AP roll & pitch squawks prior to eng. shut down on the fuel pits. 77 yrs young & still working acft. for the City of Palmdale Ca. Joe Davies Heritage Air Park. Have a Hun we trucked from George. Dick Sinclair


Ron S, e-mail, 17.12.2010 00:22

Looks like we're finally going to get our very own F-100 Super Sabre museum. I will be built in Gilmer Texas and have one each of every F-100 model that served in the USAF on static display. The organization that is sponsoring it is called Friends of the Super Sabre. They have a page on the internet.


Troy, e-mail, 07.12.2010 22:31

I worked in Periodic Maintenance at Spangdalhem AFB Germany from 1959 to 63. Also went TDY to Wheelus AFB on the F105D. Would love to hear from anybody that was stationed at Spang especially during this time.


Jerry Holloway, e-mail, 03.12.2010 11:13

Correction of email address. Audreyjerry37@cmail.com

Cc at MBAFB in 57&58 in the 356fbs


Bob Merrell, e-mail, 30.11.2010 02:29

I was stationed at Turner AFB in Albany ,Ga 1955 to 1959.
We got the 100D' s in '57. Tdy to Hahn AFB in '58 6 month
TDY. I was a PM dock chief and sometimes crew chief. We left our birds at Myrtle Beach on the homeward leg. Tdyed
back to Myrtle Beach to crew for departure to the Scandinavian countries on a goodwill tour. I pulled the transfer inspection on the last F100D in Jan. '59 to leave Turner and was discharged 2 weeks later. I got a ride in the 100F while in Germany and we took it to Mach 1.1. great ride in a great fighter at the time. This was the
31st TFW which was transfered in name only to George AFB, CA. While at Hahn was attached to the 307th TFS.


R. Jacobs, e-mail, 22.11.2010 20:16

I crewed 55-2947 in 10th TFS in France before we had to move to Hahn Germany. My pilot was Lt Nunn. Chuck Yager (who broke the sound barrier) was in the 417th Sq. of the 50 TFW. Col R Ruby was the Sq. Commander of the 10th and I shore do miss the old Sq. it was the BEST! Wouldn't mind hearing from any of the old 10Th, especially Lt Nunn.


WALT HOUSE, e-mail, 13.11.2010 19:31

I WAS A YOUNG T/SGT F-100D CREW CHIEF AND FLIGHT CHIEF IN "D" FLIGHT OF THE 44TH FBS, 18TH FBW AT KADENA AB, OKINAWA FROM FEB 57 - OCT 59. WE HAD A HIGH ACCIDENT RATE WITH MOST DUE TO ENGINE FAILURES. WITH ALL THAT WATER AROUND, MOST RESULTED IN EJECTIONS WITH LOSS OF THE AIRCRAFT. TCTO'S ADDED A SEPARATE (FROM THE ENGINE) OIL SYSTEM FOR THE CSD AND AN IMPROVED OILING AND COOLING FOR #4 1/2 BEARING. ONE ACCIDENT EARLY IN TRANSITION WAS QUITE MEMORABLE. LT. FEARS IN (I THINK) 55-3642 GOT IT INTO A PORPOIS ON TAKEOFF, GOT AIRBORN IN A HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK AND STOOD ON THE THRUST IN HE PROVERBIAL "SABER DANCE". IT ROLLED TO THE RIGHT AND WHILE INVERTED, SCRAPED THE VERTICAL FIN ON THE RUNWAY WHICH LOWERED THE NOSE TO LEVEL FLIGHT. THE ROLL CONTINUED TO STRAIGHT AND LEVEL AND THE TAKEOFF WAS COMPLETED. DURING THE PORPOIS ALL TIRES WERE BLOWN SO THE HAIRY LANDING WAS MADE ON FLATS. POST LANDING INSPECTION REVEALED NUMEROUS HOLES IN THE FLAPS AND LOWER FUSELAGE FROM TIRE AND WHEEL FRAGMENTS. THE TAIL SKID WAS PUSHED UP INTO THE A/B AND THE A/B NOZZLE WAS EGG SHAPED. WE GOT IT BACK ON THE FLIGHT LINE ABOUT SIX MONTHS LATER AFTER A DEPOT TEAM REPAIR. I GOT A FEW HOURS IN THE BACK SEAT OF AN "F" MODEL DURING CROSS COUNTRY FLIGHTS AND A COUPLE OF DART TOW TARGET FLIGHTS. WHAT A BLAST. ANY 44TH GUYS OUT THERE?


Milton Moore, e-mail, 06.11.2010 22:19

The F-100 was the first aircraft I flew after pilot training and F-86/F-100 gunnery training at Williams and Nellis AFBs. I was assigned to the 480th FBS at England AFB. The F-100 was the hardest aircraft to land and refuel of any that I ever flew. The probe set behind the cockpit on the swept wing and we refueled off of KB-50s with the long hose/drogue -- a real challenge at night. When I had 500 hours, I was thrilled to fly wing and island hop to deliver our F-100s to Chamont, France. Got to stop by the World's Fair in Belgium coming home. The 366 TFW closed in 59 and I was much relieved to be assigned to the 479th TFW at George AFB flying the F-104.


Larry Maddelein, e-mail, 30.10.2010 20:28

After years of research, I have found the fate of my beloved USAF F100D 56-3248.
I was the Crew Chief of this aircraft during my tour at Ramstein AFB in Germany.

Born in Inglewood, California in May 1958, this fighter spent most of its lifespan
in Europe. It did crash once severely damaging the aft section, and I took it over
after it was repaired and returned to Ramstein. 248 was a fine aircraft.

After newer aircraft replaced the aging F100 fleet, 248 spent some time with the
Colorado and Iowa Air National Guards. I even have a picture of 248 in Iowa.

I lost track of 248 after it was shipped to storage at Davis Monthann AFB
in September of 1977. I have been hunting for it for years.

I just received a life history of this F100 and I am sad to know its fate.

248 was sent to Mojave, California in September 1985 for drone modification.
Then sent to Tyndall AFB for drone checkout.
Then sent to Holloman AFB.

248 gave its life training others to help keep us free.

F100D 56-3248 was killed on March 27th, 1988 over White Sands Testing Range.

I am sad.


Louis Franck, e-mail, 29.10.2010 05:25

F-100D crew chief with the 401st TFW 613 SQ. Station at England AFB Alexandria LA. When England AFB closed the Wing mover to Torregon AFB Spain around 1965. TDY to Germany, Aviano, Wheelus AFB, and of course pad duty in Turkey. Had a ride in a F model while at Wheelus. Great airplane and a lot of memories as a crew chief on the
F-100D and sometimes F model.


Cal Reed, e-mail, 01.10.2010 22:59

I was fortunate to have spent over 20 hours riding in the F model, while stationed at Ramstein AFB. I was in Ammo and provided weapons to the Hot Pad. My Commander Lt Col Watkins sent me to Altitude Chamber in Weisbaden and from there on, whenever I had the chance, I rode the wind.
Great aircraft!


Donnie Smith, e-mail, 25.09.2010 10:23

I was a crew chief at Myrtle Beach 64-66. We went TDY a lot and had rotational duty in Aviano and Turkey.It was fun to travel when we were single but it was real hard on the married men. At one point the wing commander made it mandatory for families off base to move on base, and it was a huge financial strain for the people that had bought homes in the city. We worked 12 to 14 hour days to maintain over 100 aircraft in 4 squadrons.I eventually was assigned to Wheelus and suffered with the C models. It was hot there and the maintenance people had to grin and suffer. We had very few NCOs and not enough airman. During the 6 day war all the families were evaced out, never to return. it was a real Hell Hole.


donald dunsmore, e-mail, 25.09.2010 03:37

I WAS STAIONED AR HAHN A.F.B. GERMANY FROM 1961 UNTIL 1964 AND WORKED AT GROUND EQUIPMENT. I REMEMBER WORKING ON THE FLIGHT LINE WITH THE F- 100'S AS WELL AS THE F-102'S TAKING THE GROUND EQUIP. TO AND FROM THE FLIGHT LINE. IT SEAMS LIKE A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. I WAS ONLY 17 YEARS OLD WHEN I GOT THERE AND 20 YEARS OLD WHEN I LEFT ( STILL NOT OLD ENOUGH TO DRINK WHEN I GOT BACK TO THE STATES) ONE THING THAT I WILL NEVER FORGET IS THE T.D.Y. TO NORTH AFRICA (TRIPOLY) THERE WAS NOT MUCH TO DO THERE BUT WE ALL WORKED TOGETHER AND MADE THE BEST OF IT.


Al Lewis, e-mail, 21.09.2010 03:59

Went through Luke AFB CCTS in the Hun in early 69 .
Super bunch of IP's: Skipper Webb, Shorty McEnthun , Pete Kehoe , Jay Blume , Ben Briggs and many others got this old ADC retread qualified in a super fighter . Survived 217 missions at Tuy Hoa RVN .


chasewick, e-mail, 19.09.2010 07:52

Looking for a cockpit part from an F100 for an award to honor the service of a retired general who flew the Hun. Maybe an instrument or grip or data plate. Any suggestions??


T/Sgt Sam McIntyre, e-mail, 13.09.2010 18:04

I was a flight chief for the 100C while stationed at Nellis AFB May 1960 - May 1962. I was invited to Florida for the Cuban Crisis. Too many problems with the 100 to get attached to it. Learned to love Nevada and watch the Thunderbirds practice.


Jerry holloway, e-mail, 07.09.2010 00:01

Cc in 356FBS Myrtle Beach from 57 to 58.
Retired from Delta AIr Lines in 1989


Jerry holloway, e-mail, 07.09.2010 00:00

Cc in 356FBS Myrtle Beach from 57 to 58.
Retired from Delta AIr Lines in 1989


Dale Williams, e-mail, 30.08.2010 16:56

we have a F100D we are putting on static display. does anyone have drawings for the lifting lugs, their attachment points and the spreaderbar all used to lift the airplane off the ground. Dale


Paul R. Ward, e-mail, 19.08.2010 18:31

Gentlemen;
The max airspeed of an F100 Super Saber was 750 knots, which is about 850 mph. You need to adjust your data in the data area.
Respectfully;
Paul R. Ward


Bob N, e-mail, 30.04.2010 17:38

I was assigned to Aviano AB, Italy from '68-'71. Aviano used rotational squadron F-100's from Lackenheath, Upper Heyford, Bentwaters, Mildenhall England.The 'bomb range' was what brought in the F-100's to test their weapons systems.However I think in '92 the range closed and this was the last of the "Rotational Squadrons' at Aviano.


Darryll, e-mail, 21.04.2010 06:09

I was stationed at Nellis AFB,NV in 1958. I did radio repairs on the Super Sabre. I loved the bird. It was my first assignment out of tech school at Scott AFB IL. I am now 72 and look back on those days as wonderful. I really enjoyed watching the Thunder Birds practice in the Sabres.


J. Stephens, e-mail, 11.04.2010 20:07

Reading that Herb Greathouse worked on F-100's from George AFB in the late 50's. At the time my father Col Robert W. Stephens was Wing Commander of that fighter group. Late 1959 he was transferred to Langley as Director of Inspection for TAC. Was killed at Cannon AFB on April 6, 1960, "Saber Dance". Trying to put together additional information about my Dad and would love to hear from anyone who might have known him.
Thanks, reply to jstephens@gvtc.com


BobD, e-mail, 08.03.2010 23:07

For What It's Worth - we (Freinds of the Super Sabre)are working to create a National Museum of the Super Saber with all four models of the F-100 and a collection of artifacts and memorabilia. We are in the embryo stage and are in the process of acquiring an F and an A, along with property. If you are interested in joining us - contact Anne Coleman pnthrs357@earthlink.net. Cheers, BobD


Bob Dunham, e-mail, 08.03.2010 23:02

Does anyone know what the tail number of the 481st TFS bird Leprechaun was? It was at Ton Son Nuut with the Crusaders in 1965? Inquiring minds want to know. Post here or send me an e-mail. Cheers, BoBD


Paco, e-mail, 25.02.2010 19:58

In early 65 I was ferring F-100F to Cannon AFB prior to overseas deployment as wild weasels. One March we were FL37 near the OK/Arkansas Border when my wingman told me I was stream fuel. My fuel state was rapidly detoriating and I needed a loooony runway. Barksdale was the cloest. All the emergency proceedures were running thru my brain, when I remembered the words of my instructor at Vance. He had told us not to believe the a/c had a glide ratio of a brick....The brick had a better glide ratio.

Ruffled a few feather at Barksdale (SAC Base), hit the outer marker @ 187 kts and then a flame out....RAT came out OK, used Nitrogen to blow down & lock the gear, put it on the ground and rode a long long time on the runway.

Fuel line came loose


Jerry d (Buzzard), 16.02.2010 22:06

To all you crew chiefs and maintenance guys that wrote in:
Many thanks for your terrific work. My peacetime and wartime sorties in the Hun were only made possible through your efforts. I always appreciated your dedication and want to thank you in this forum.


Jim, 08.02.2010 00:23

F-100C, Serial #0-4753, Christened "Susan Constant" by Winston Churchill's wife while the airplane was in England, later assigned to NM Air Guard, retired to the Air Force Museum for many years is now sitting outside at the Birmingham Airport deteriorating while waiting to go into The Air Museum of the South East. Probably the best C model that was ever in the inventory. Mistreated proud bird.


Marty, e-mail, 08.02.2010 00:12

I was at RAF Lakenheath from Jan'66-Jan'69 and recall installing inverted flight tanks in our Super Sabres every day for several months. I repaired hundreds of bird dents in 450 gallon wing tank nose cones. I actually miss the sound of the side by side night take-offs, our barracks were not that far from the end of the runway back then. Great memories of those days


DON MAYO, e-mail, 05.02.2010 22:54

I WAS AN AIRCRAFT ELECTRICIAN AT MYRTLE BEACH,SC FROM 57-62. WE HAD FOUR SQUADRON'S OF F-100D &F MODELS.I LOVED WORKING ON AND BEING AROUND THE PEOPLE WHO MAINTAINED AND FLEW THIS BEAUTIFUL AIRCRAFT. I THINK THE TOUGHEST PART WAS HAVING TO PULL THE AFT SECTION TO DO MOST OF YOUR WORK.
IN THOSE 5 YEARS I SAW A LOT OF THEM CRASH. WE LOST SOME PILOTS. I TRAVELED WITH THEM TO MATAGORDA ISLAND BOMBING RANGE,TX,NELLIS AFB,NV,GOOSE BAY,LABRADOR,CHAUMONT,FRANCE,AVIANO AB,ITALY AND MORRACO WITH STOPS IN THE AZORES AND BERMUDA. THOSE WERE THE DAYS.


Butch Daly, e-mail, 01.02.2010 00:07

I was in the Army in the 60's so I never flew a F-100 or anything for that matter however my Mom retired from North American Aviation in the 1970's where she had worked on the F-100 (among others). She brought home a model of the F-100 for me in '54 or '55 (I was 9 or 10 then) and it was my pride and joy for many years.
1952 was when Ford pick-ups went from F-1s to F-100s and to this day my all time favorite pick-up trucks.


Herb Greathouse, e-mail, 26.01.2010 12:52

I was stationed at Aviano AFB, Italy, 1959/61, Instrument Shop, F-100s there were TDY from the states. I worked with the TDY guys regularly. When the first squadron came from George AFB, CA, to a rainy winter in Italy they ask for help fixing fuel quanty write-up. Also, that long pitot tube, it was hinged, when the acft was parked it would be standing straight up like a flag pole. In rainy weather this was not good, as any pilot knows, a little water in the pitot/static system can cause big time problems. So early in the morning, even before some crew chiefs showed up one of us instrument guys would be out on the flight line lowering the pitot (flag pole) masts and open the water drains, and doing a pitot/static system leak check.

There are more stories to be told about the F-100 guy that came to Aviano, maybe someone will add to this.

I also worked on Chuck Yeager's F-100 while there.
once again FUN TIMES


Mark Pheister Chiliman, 11.01.2010 17:39

I worked on F-100 D, F, at Luke AFB 66-67 also in Phu Cat RVN 68-69 .I was a crew chief. good bird with a good pilot at the stick air to ground very good. limited load with only 4 pods very accurite with rockets and napalm. I crewd 049 622 950 Wing commanders bird 612 TFS at phu Cat


Mark Pheister Chiliman, 11.01.2010 17:35

I worked on F-100 D, F, at Luke AFB 66-67 also in Phu Cat RVN 68-69 .I was a crew chief. good bird with a good pilot at the stick air to ground very good. limited load with only 4 pods very accurite with rockets and napalm. I crewd 049 622 950 Wing commanders bird 612 TFS at phu Cat


lloyd, e-mail, 02.01.2010 19:28

As a crew chief on F-100D I agree with Gil.Lots of leaks,changed a lot of tires with flat spots.Not fun.A/C 095 of the 428th TFS crashed during landing.It was rebuilt and back in service.While on a night mission the controls locked up,hit his wingman they both went dawn.NOT GOOD!


Bob Dunham, e-mail, 02.01.2010 01:12

www.supersabresociety.com


Dick Cottle, e-mail, 31.12.2009 21:58

In addition to first production Super Sonic, how about air-to-air defense of Berlin corridors post the Berlin Blockade, Tasked as single engine, single seat, Nuke (one way) delivery, if the big one came, the major provider of air to ground support in South Viet Nam, and most decorated and dangerous missions flying Fast Fac (Misty) on the Ho Chi Men trail in North Viet Nam and Laos. Two pilots in an F and always a single ship.


Ken, e-mail, 13.12.2009 03:58

I flew the F-100 from 1962 to 1971. Great plane, never let me down. Yep, it was underpowered but still a ball to fly. Currently restoring F-100D 56-3081 for display at MAPS Air Museum, Akron/Canton Airport, Ohio.


Bill, e-mail, 05.12.2009 21:36

I flew F-100 D/F in Vietnam and Europe. Great bird for it's time, although lacking to compete with newer jets in air-to-air due to limited thrust to weight. I later flew the F-4E's... They had twice as much thrust as the F-100 and weighed about the same... Jim... Yes it did have adverse yaw, but had a fine roll rate air-to-air if you use the rudder to roll, amazing roll rate... Also, looked fantastic is the "Thunderbird Scheme"... Bill


Sam Herron, e-mail, 03.12.2009 00:37

I flew the F-100C at Foster AFB, but not enough to form an opinion about it.


Rich Davis, e-mail, 13.10.2009 09:36

Tough to maintain, but I felt priviledged to be able to do it. We had a great mission that it did very well. Crew Chief 79 TFS 64-67 RAF Woodbridge


Wayne, e-mail, 08.08.2009 19:45

As a recalled guardsman they had me ferry a D model to Nam. I filed for FL 350 out of Canon planning to climb enroute. Going through 290 I told my wingman I had to go back to Canon as the plane wouldn’t fly. He had flown Ds on active duty and decided to let me see for myself why FL350 was wildly optimistic. I learned why we never saw Ds in the restricted area. They would be hopeless against a Crusader. The C model was a competitive fighter even if it landed supersonic. Final speed was 163k plus fuel on the C, not 183. Still pretty fast.


Gil, e-mail, 22.03.2009 22:02

Lots of hydraulic leaks, & a bear to change the tire on. Was able to get eight consecutive missions without a diagonal discrepency. 60-64 RAF Woodbridge 79th TFS


Mark Cook, e-mail, 17.08.2008 05:08

My first of three three tours as an instructor pilot was in the F-100 in the USAF Fighter Weapons School at Nellis, starting in 1958. It sure was an improvement over the SAC F-84Fs that I had flown previously. But, one day I tangled with a T-33, and no matter what I tried, every time I saw that darn thing it was pointed right at me. Nellis was a great assignement, and fortunately they kept sending me back there. I knew many of the guys who have streets named after them in the housing area at Nellis...most of them made the supreme sacrifice in the Hun.


tom clark, e-mail, 14.07.2008 02:51

Just remember one thing - it was the first airplane in the world that could sustain supersonic speed in level flight. I seem to remember reading somewhere they did that on the first test flight! Can anyone confirm?

Sorry Jack got eaten high by F-86's, but I've had more than a few F-4s for lunch if they wanted to try to turn below 400 Kts.

Visit Supersabresociety.com if you are an old Hun driver.


Ed Holley, e-mail, 13.07.2008 01:37

I am a member of the Commemorative Air Force - Highland Lakes Sq. located in Burnet, Texas. The City has a F-100F on static and it is getting repainted. When it was put on display the canopy got opened just a little and appears to be jammed on a lifing lug that was left on the plane. Would like to try to open canopy to remove lug and then close canopy completely but have no information on manual procedure for opening and closing. Does anybody have knowledge on how to work the canopy manually w/o elect or hyd power? Help greatly appreciated. Ed


roger Moore, e-mail, 21.06.2008 23:56

The F-100 as we know was a Fighter-Bomber with essence on the bomber. The F-100C I flew had no flaps and approached at 183 kts plus fuel so it's STOL capabilities were lacking.


Jack, e-mail, 20.05.2008 05:46

While stationed at Hahn AB, Germany, the Canadians used to eat us up in air-to-air tactics with their Mark VI (a super-powered F-86). Every year the Canadian jocks would send us a Christmas card showing their gunsight camera firmly planted on our tailpipe. They'd absolutely kill us at high altitude. The F-100 was a building brick in air-to-air - especially at high altitude. Can't count the times I fell out of the sky trying to out turn a Mark VI above 30,000'


Jim, 30.04.2008 21:42

To Bob,above on 08.04.2008,as a former F-100 pilot,I wasn't aware that the Navy's "Blue Angels" ever flew the F-100--I think you meant the Air Force's "Thunderbirds", who did fly the F-100s.
It was a great ground attack aircraft,loved by the "grunts" on the ground and us Air Force FACs controlling them.
It was lousy in air-to-air as a fighter with severe adverse yaw problems while trying to turn under a g-load and had a bad habit of compressor stalls at the worst possible times.


Bob, e-mail, 08.04.2008 20:34

Wonderful bird for its day. It performed well in acrobatics, combat and training. Its no wonder that the Blue Angels used this for many years and why it is still sought after as a restoration plane. F's and D's still fly today!


Trevor, 19.09.2007 05:57

Awesome fighter DASI.


DASI, 30.07.2007 23:45

CRAP FIGHTER




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